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Download The Wrong Men: America's Epidemic of Wrongful Death Row Convictions ePub

by Stanley Cohen

Download The Wrong Men: America's Epidemic of Wrongful Death Row Convictions ePub
  • ISBN 0786712589
  • ISBN13 978-0786712588
  • Language English
  • Author Stanley Cohen
  • Publisher Carroll & Graf; 1st Carroll & Graf Ed edition (August 14, 2003)
  • Pages 256
  • Formats azw doc mbr lrf
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1586 kb
  • Size Fb2 1548 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 795

In January 2000, Illinois Governor George H. Ryan declared a moratorium on state executions. Three years later, Ryan commuted all Illinois death sentences to life imprisonment, saying, “Our capital system is haunted by the demon of error, error in determining guilt, and error in determining who among the guilty deserves to die.” This book chronicles over one hundred cases where journalism students, grassroots organizations, families, and pro bono lawyers—armed with DNA evidence and other instruments of justice—have defeated that demon. Cohen reveals how eyewitness error, jailhouse snitch testimony, racism, junk science, prosecutorial misconduct, and incompetent counsel have often populated America’s death row with the wrong men. Readers embark on journeys with men who were arrested, convicted, sentenced to death, dragged through the appeals system, and finally set free based on their actual innocence. Some languished for decades in our death houses. Notable cases of wrongful imprisonment outside of death row are also profiled. Although these stories end with vindication, there are those that have ended with unjustified execution. The Wrong Men is sure to fuel controversy over a justice system that has delivered the ultimate punishment 820 times since 1976, though it cannot guarantee accurate convictions.

Some languished for decades in our death houses. Notable cases of wrongful imprisonment outside of death row are also profiled.

Some languished for decades in our death houses. Although these stories end with vindication, there are those that have ended with unjustified execution. The Wrong Men is sure to fuel controversy over a justice system that has delivered the ultimate punishment 820 times since 1976, though it cannot guarantee accurate convictions.

All that aside, Stanley Cohen's book is packed with a lot of great reading I plan on reading this book through again

All that aside, Stanley Cohen's book is packed with a lot of great reading. I can't imagine the pain and suffering a person wrongly convicted must endure, and of course, reading this book is not going to make me understand how it feels. But I can say it has opened my eyes to how blatantly wrong many of these prosecutions have been handled. I plan on reading this book through again. I find most non-fiction books to be a boring read, but Cohen is a great writer - he manages to never bore the reader, and makes a brilliant presentation in this book. This book should be a TOP TEN BESTSELLER!

Joseph Burrows was released from death row after his attorney Kathleen Zellner persuaded the real killer to confess at the . Cohen, Stanley (2003). The Wrong Men: America's Epidemic of Wrongful Death Row Convictions. Carroll & Graf Publishers. p. 41. ISBN 978-0-7867-1258-8.

Joseph Burrows was released from death row after his attorney Kathleen Zellner persuaded the real killer to confess at the post-conviction hearing, and Peter Rooney, a reporter for the Champaign-Urbana News-Gazette, obtained a recantation from a key witness.

Select Format: Hardcover.

Offers the stories of more than one hundred individuals falsely accused and wrongfully convicted of crimes, innocent men and women who were imprisoned for years on death row before they obtained postconviction exonerations

Offers the stories of more than one hundred individuals falsely accused and wrongfully convicted of crimes, innocent men and women who were imprisoned for years on death row before they obtained postconviction exonerations.

Manufacturer: Carroll & Graf Release date: 14 August 2003 ISBN-10 : 0786712589 ISBN-13: 9780786712588. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

The book details the wrongful convictions of two men, Kennedy Brewer and Levon Brooks, in the separate murders of two .

The book details the wrongful convictions of two men, Kennedy Brewer and Levon Brooks, in the separate murders of two girls in the same rural Mississippi town in the early 1990s. We are also spared the anguish of wondering if the system will ever get it right, for we know the men have already been freed thanks to the work of the nonprofit criminal exoneration organization the Innocence Project.

Cohen, Stanley, 1934-.

Talk about The Wrong Men: America's Epidemic of Wrongful Death Row Convictions


Ieregr
This was a very interesting read. Thank God for DNA
VariesWent
Written in 2003, this book tells the stories of the 102 people who were erroneously convicted and sent to death row to await their execution. It attempts to analyze in a systematic way the causes of these, the most egregious cases in a criminal justice system presently beset across the board with notorious miscarriages of justice.

In order to cut to the chase and make a very long series of stories much shorter, suffice it to say that the author found six reasons for these 102 "state sanctioned" deaths: (1) faulty eye witness testimony as the sole basis for conviction; (2) police and prosecutorial misconduct; (3) false testimony from jailhouse informants; (4) erroneous scientific evidence; (5) forced or coerced confessions; and (6) questionable circumstantial evidence and hearsay.

Without in any way attempting to cast addition aspersions upon the police and criminal justice officials, and without lost of generality, it seems clear that all six of these categories could just as easily be telescoped down to a single cause, the second cause, prosecutorial and police misconduct. In the end, it is inescapable that these six causes all amount to some form of police and prosecutorial misconduct. This further suggests that the problem of these gross miscarriages of justice is a cultural problem within the criminal justice system itself.

Without the evidence provided in this book, most Americans would assume that it would be virtually impossible for two brothers to be sent to the electric chair for being convicted of killing a man (who was later discovered to be alive); based on animal (rather than) human bones; and by the testimony of both a Psychic and a jailhouse witness (who in any case would have been a more likely suspect of having killed the alive man).

This comedy of errors, which is emblematic of the other 101 cases in this book, actually happened to Jesse and Stephen Boorn. In order to at least save Jesse, Stephen confessed to a murder he did not commit, nor had not even occurred. And except for faulty eyewitness testimony, (as was true in 54% of these 102 cases), this case contained a combination of some variation of all the other five elements.

As this author summarizes it: a trial is just a contest in which someone, (often anyone) has to be held publicly accountable. It is the police job to produce "a most likely (not THE) guilty party." In the end, history has proven that it is much more important to the American public and the American criminal justice system that a suspected death be avenged, than that justice be done, and done fairly, correctly and without error. Faced with a choice between seeing a crime go unavenged, or having an innocent person convicted, it seems that the American public as well as the criminal justice system itself -- has consistently opted for the latter.

Since justice lies on the plane of public perceptions as well as on the plane of the public's thirst for revenge, the public has become accustomed to tolerating serious miscarriages in justice without proposing even elementary remedial reforms. The task of reforms has been left to the Center for Wrongful Convictions (CWC) that proposed: (1) modifying eyewitness identification procedures, (2) requiring police to videotape interrogations and confessions, and (3) banning testimony by informants who will be rewarded for their cooperation.

Incredibly, these imminently reasonable stopgap measures have all been met with hostility and scorn by those within the criminal justice system as being too draconian and tying the hands of law enforcement. (Go figure?) Excuse me, but would draconian not be sentencing two men to the electric chair for a murder that did not occur, based on a Psychic's and a jailhouse snitch's testimony? Four stars
Sharpbrew
I live in Indiana, very close to the border with Illinois. Our local news comes out of Chicago, Illinois, and since a large portion of the stories included in this non-fiction novel took place in the "Land of Lincoln" I was very familiar with a lot of the cases.

As I state in my title of this review, I am pro-death penalty. But I believe this book proves that our judicial system needs to improve greatly. The stories in this book are proof that there are flaws in the system - as I believe there will always be, in any system. The problem is that in many of these cases common sense should have stopped a wrongful conviction. It didn't, and Stanley Cohen does a fantastic job of pointing that out.

Now, why am I still pro-death penalty. Because I believe, as long as America allows the murder of the most innocent human life (a child in the womb), our justice system should be allowed to dole out the most harshest punishment available for the act of murder on those outside the womb. Elaborating on this - in Cohen's book he uses a quote from Clarence Darrow: "There isn't, I submit, a single admissible argument in favor of capital punishment. Nature loves life. We believe that life should be protected and preserved. The thing which keeps one from killing is the emotion they have against it; and the greater sanctity that the state pays to life, the greater the feeling of sanctity the individual has for life."

I couldn't agree more. And I look forward to the day when anti-death penalty activists line up outside abortion clinics with their message of supporting the sanctity of life. The day I see this happening, I will join the Stanley Cohen's of the world and march with them outside a scheduled execution, protesting the extreme punishment. Cohen, feel free to take me up on this, if you dare.

All that aside, Stanley Cohen's book is packed with a lot of great reading. I can't imagine the pain and suffering a person wrongly convicted must endure, and of course, reading this book is not going to make me understand how it feels. But I can say it has opened my eyes to how blatantly wrong many of these prosecutions have been handled. This book is also written in a rapid-fire manner, that you almost have to take a break from every so often. I tried to remind myself that most of time, the death penalty is not given to innocent men. But then I had to remind myself, just once, and the horror for that one is enough.

I plan on reading this book through again. I find most non-fiction books to be a boring read, but Cohen is a great writer - he manages to never bore the reader, and makes a brilliant presentation in this book.

It amazes me that there are not hundreds of reviews posted here. This book should be a TOP TEN BESTSELLER! Just another example of how hype and timing play into that list.

Buy this book no matter what side of the aisle you're on. It is a MUST READ. Have I mentioned that yet?

See ya next review.