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Download This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral--Plus Plenty of Valet Parking!--in America's Gilded Capital ePub

by Mark Leibovich

Download This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral--Plus Plenty of Valet Parking!--in America's Gilded Capital ePub
  • ISBN 0399161309
  • ISBN13 978-0399161308
  • Language English
  • Author Mark Leibovich
  • Publisher Penguin Press; First edition (July 16, 2013)
  • Pages 400
  • Formats mobi lrf lit lrf
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1453 kb
  • Size Fb2 1609 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 788

Washington D.C. might be loathed from every corner of the nation, yet these are fun and busy days at this nexus of big politics, big money, big media, and big vanity. There are no Democrats and Republicans anymore in the nation's capital, just millionaires. Through the eyes of Leibovich we discover how the funeral for a beloved newsman becomes the social event of the year; how political reporters are fetishized for their ability to get their names into the predawn e-mail sent out by the city's most powerful and puzzled-over journalist; how a disgraced Hill aide can overcome ignominy and maybe emerge with a more potent "brand" than many elected members of Congress. And how an administration bent on "changing Washington" can be sucked into the ways of This Town with the same ease with which Tea Party insurgents can, once elected, settle into it like a warm bath. Outrageous, fascinating, and very necessary, This Town is a must-read whether you're inside the highway which encircles DC - or just trying to get there.

Instead of America’s Fourth Estate providing a check on the corruption, they have drunk from the Kool-Aid and drunk deeply. I didn’t pick up This Town because I am disillusioned, though certainly provides plenty of fodder for those who have lost faith in the fair and transparent workings of government.

In This Town, Mark Leibovich, chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, presents a. .Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Through his eyes, we discover how the funeral for a beloved newsman becomes the social event of the year. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Includes bibliographical references. A book about contemporary political culture in Washington, DC"-. Washington funerals can make great networking opportunities. Disgraced Hill aides can overcome ignominy and emerge with a more potent "brand" than many elected members of Congress.

Ce pays-ci ( this country here ) is what the denizens of Versailles called their gilded cage in the reign of Louis XIV. This town is the name that members of what was once called the American Establishment have given their special place on the Potomac. In the most entertaining and depressing book about the . political system published in many years, Leibovich lets readers peep behind the curtain and see what goes on in the greenrooms and at the parties of the Washington elite.

Article in Society 51(5) · October 2014 with 21 Reads. How we measure 'reads'.

In Mark Leibovich’s remarkable look at the way things really work in . a funeral for a beloved television star becomes the perfect networking platform, a disgraced political aide can emerge with more power than his boss, campaign losers befriend their vanquishers (and make more money than ever!), "conflict of interest" is a term lost in translation, political reporters.

1. Society volume 51, pages584–587(2014)Cite this article. How political reporters are fetishized for their ability to get their names into the predawn e-mail sent out by the city's most powerful and puzzled-over journalist.

In his new book This Town, Mark Leibovich commits an act of treason against the Washington . He is in all the parties, and supplies a wildly entertaining anthrolopogical tour

In his new book This Town, Mark Leibovich commits an act of treason against the Washington establishmen. horoughly entertainin. eibovich is a keen observer and energetic writer. Reid Pillifant, New York Observer This Town is a frothy Beltway insider tell-al. ollicking fun and sharply written. He is in all the parties, and supplies a wildly entertaining anthrolopogical tour. Jonathan Chait, New York Magazine Leibovich has written a very funny book about how horrible his industry can b. ncommonly honest. David Weigel, Slate is a master of the political profile.

In Leibovich’s description of a 2008 memorial service for Tim Russert, fellow TV journalists and an array of politicians briefly don . Predictably, Washington insiders have tried to act scandalized by This Town’s revelations, said Andrew Ferguson in The Wall Street Journal.

In Leibovich’s description of a 2008 memorial service for Tim Russert, fellow TV journalists and an array of politicians briefly don grave faces before partaking in an orgy of networking. Refreshingly, Leibovich never repeats the liberal media’s somnambulant clichés about Washington’s being ruined by Republican zealots. His targets instead are the moderates who speak proudly of across-the-aisle cooperation while feeding on lobbyists’ largesse. Yet that’s harder than it sounds.

Talk about This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral--Plus Plenty of Valet Parking!--in America's Gilded Capital


Yahm
Most citizens probably believe what Mr. Leibovich writes that "... capital commandments of self-interest, self-importance, self-enrichment, and self-perpetuation" are the very nature of Washington D.C. culture. Based upon the author's book, they're right. The place sounds like an adult version of middle school habits. Mr. Leibovich acknowledges up front that he is part of this culture but not up in the rarefied air of the big powerbrokers. However, his book is not just about the big boys (well, mostly big white boys). He delivers his observations in a knowledgeable but cynical and sometimes funny view. The paperback edition was published in 2014. Since then some of the people noted in the work have fallen from grace because of their lies or sexual harassment charges. It will be interesting to see if they will bounce back into the D.C. fray like Mr. Leibovitch shows with other individuals.

The book begins during the final months of the 2008 election between Senator Obama and Senator McCain and ends with the completion of the 2012 race between President Obama and Mitt Romney. It starts with the Washington establishment attending the service commemorating the death of NBC's reporter Tim Russert. It is an interesting and effective start to the book. The attendees have duel objectives in being there. Part of it is to hobnob with other players in the D.C. game. Networking is the major religion in this town. My word, the amount of parties thrown in D.C. is practically infinite. I'm an introvert. Even typing about these people networking and attending oodles of parties makes me almost break out in hives and want to puke. It sounds like my version of Hell. Mr. Leibovich covers such things as the incessant social climbing, the dinner-and-cocktail circuit, the trivilization and gossipy nature of news, the economic D.C. bubble that's impervious to recessions, the Correspondents' Association dinner, how Politico has altered the Washington news landscape, how lying is as common as breathing to these people, how they believe most voters are stupid, and the revolving door between careers as politicians and lobbyists. I was surprised to read some names of past politicians who are still working and schmoozing in D.C. Heck, I thought some of them were dead. Trump is mentioned in passing as simply a wacky nuisance. Boy, have times changed since the book's publication.

Maybe it was unavoidable that Washington would evolve into what it now is. Most of the people mentioned work long hours in an effort to succeed. Success in D.C. is usually defined by either money, celebrity, money, helping form policy, or money. 'This Town' is a good explanation of the disconnect between Washington and the rest of the nation. I can see why the author/reporter was once an idealist who evolved into a cynic. The book is informative, occasionally funny, gossipy, and snarky. D.C. is an interesting place to visit but I sure wouldn't want to live there.
Tiainar
Perhaps I'm just too cynical after working for nonprofit advocacy groups all these years. I found This Town absolutely hilarious, first because it is masterfully written and second because it hits every single ironic nail squarely on the head.

Having viewed many of these Beltway shenanigans from a distance, I often suspected that the behind-the-scenes action was clubby and elitist -- that they all were in it together, Republicans and Democrats alike, media personalities and their sources, putting on a partisan show for the rest of us so we would think they were doing something meaningful. Now we have proof that the whole thing is a scam, courtesy of Mark Leibovich.

For years I've been annoyed at the cloying, saccharine way media 'pundits' talked about every little non-event in Washington as if it actually mattered. And the way that every influencer-wannabe obsessed over Senator Armpit's (R-Podunk) legislative aide sleeping with Rep Who's-It's (D-Bumf**k) husband, as if anyone cared, including Rep Who's-It. Finally, Mark Leibovich has come to my rescue, calling a spade for exactly what it is. I feel, as the therapists say, validated.

The media suits, particularly those who presume to call themselves journalists, should be ashamed to report this treif. All of Washington is like a huge Rube Goldberg machine that feeds itself and works hardest at keeping a straight face so the rest of us won't see past the illusions it spins. The average citizen can't do much about this and outrage seems to make no difference, so all we can do is laugh.

And you will definitely laugh throughout This Town, assuming you appreciate irony and don't take the government too seriously.
Sinredeemer
For taxpayers, Leibovich's book brings into focus how indifferent our elected officials are to those of us who elected them.
Still, if you can set aside a so-this-is-how-my-tax-dollars-are-spent mentality, you should find the book witty, gossipy and informative - though not surprising. You must see the politicos and hangers-on as the preening pretenders that most of them are. There are few statesmen and women among this crowd and few genuine leaders - from the voter's point of view. Even when they say they are not making deals, they are. I have heard there's no longer a big social scene in D.C., a la the Reagan years, but apparently there is.

I am put off that the author has commercialized his relationships - no matter how shallow they are - but I am a political junkie so I downloaded the book on my Kindle anyway. It confirms what many of us have observed for years: media are more intent on protecting treasured sources than reporting the truth. Sometimes media ignore nasty stories about their favorite news sources. Whether it's Clinton, Petraeus or someone like Anthony Weiner, media love to tear down public figures (it sells)but celebrate their so-called comebacks (it sells). This book also confirms that those who have gotten caught with hands in the cookie jar or on private parts of a much younger woman, were usually already knee-deep in their misdeeds. Lesson for us: forgiving is fine, but we should probably not reelect these people - and we don't have to admire them either. It's fun to just laugh at them.