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Download American Individualism: How a New Generation of Conservatives Can Save the Republican Party ePub

by Margaret Hoover

Download American Individualism: How a New Generation of Conservatives Can Save the Republican Party ePub
  • ISBN 0307718158
  • ISBN13 978-0307718150
  • Language English
  • Author Margaret Hoover
  • Publisher Crown Forum (July 19, 2011)
  • Pages 272
  • Formats lit txt mobi doc
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1676 kb
  • Size Fb2 1441 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 425

Margaret Hoover has been a lifelong member of the Republican Party. She grew up a self-described “ditto head.” She worked in the White House for President George W. Bush. Today she is a political commentator for Fox News, where, as one of Bill O’Reilly’s Culture Warriors, she regularly champions the conservative cause. She also happens to be the great-granddaughter of the thirty-first president of the United States, Herbert Hoover. These impeccable conservative credentials underscore the gravity of her deep-seated concerns about the future of the Republican Party. Her party, she believes, has fallen dangerously out of step with the rising generation of young Americans.   In American Individualism, Margaret Hoover chal-lenges the up-and-coming millennial generation to take another look at the Republican Party. Although millennials rarely identify themselves as Republicans, Hoover contends that these young men and women who helped elect President Barack Obama are sympathetic to the fundamental principles of conservatism. She makes a compelling case for how the GOP can right itself and capture the allegiance of this group. She believes that her party is uniquely positioned to offer solutions for the most pressing problems facing America—skyrocketing debt and deficits, crises in education and immigration, a war against Islamist supremacy—but that it is held back by the outsize influence within the party of social and religious conservatives.    American Individualism is Hoover’s call to action for Republicans to embrace a conservatism that emphasizes individual freedom both in economic policy and in the realm of social issues in order to appeal to the new generation of voters. The Republican Party, Hoover asserts, can win the support of the millennials while at the same time remaining faithful to conservative principles. In a journey that is both political and personal, Hoover rediscovers these bedrock conservative values in the writings of her great-grandfather, President Herbert Hoover, who emphasized the vital importance of individual freedom to the American way of life and who sought to strike a delicate balance in identifying the limited yet essential role the federal government should play in the lives of Americans.    Margaret Hoover advocates a conservatism that is fully consistent with the original impulses of the American conservative movement. It evokes her great-grandfather’s emphasis on the values of civic responsibility and service to others—instincts instilled in the millennial generation. She argues that the Republican Party today must evolve in order to achieve greatness, and that it can do so without compromising its tried-and-true fundamental principles. On the contrary, those enduring principles, if consistently applied, will enable the party to attract a younger following.    An impassioned and persuasive political manifesto grounded in twentieth-century history and targeted at the most perplexing problems of the twenty-first century, Margaret Hoover’s American Individualism offers provocative ideas not just for reinvigorating the Republican Party but also for strengthening America in the decades ahead.Praise for American Individualism:“It is not her great grandfather’s Republican party anymore. And Margaret Hoover has written a book that old Herbert would enjoy. Sassy, opinionated, and smart, Ms. Hoover shakes up conventional GOP wisdom.”  —Bill O’Reilly, Anchor, Fox News Channel  “Margaret Hoover, a fresh and brilliant young voice in the Republican Party, is bent on connecting the GOP to rising generations of the young. She has something to say to their elders, too. They'd best hear her.” —Peggy Noonan, columnist, Wall Street Journal“Margaret Hoover's American Individualism is a must read for every member of the Republican party—elected or otherwise—as a new generation of Republicans try to shine new light on who exactly we should be.” —Meghan McCain, author of Dirty Sexy Politics


Margaret Hoover's American Individualism is a must read for every member of the Republican party-elected or otherwise-as a new generation of Republicans try to shine new light on who exactly we should be. -Meghan McCain, author of Dirty Sexy Politics

Margaret Hoover's American Individualism is a must read for every member of the Republican party-elected or otherwise-as a new generation of Republicans try to shine new light on who exactly we should be. -Meghan McCain, author of Dirty Sexy Politics. Hoover is an engaging personality with timely advice for Republicans. Her book and her messag. re helpful guides to candidates and political operatives. And frankly, the Republican Party of New Yor. ight do well to get her on the ballot somewhere in 2012.

Margaret Hoover's American Individualism is a must read for every member of the Republican party-elected or otherwise-as a new generation of Republicans try to shine new light on who exactly we should be. Publisher: Crown Forum. Pages: 272. ISBN 10: 0307718158.

In American Individualism, Margaret Hoover chal-lenges the up-and-coming millennial generation to take another look at the Republican Party. Although millennials rarely identify themselves as Republicans, Hoover contends that these young men and women who helped elect President Barack Obama are sympathetic to the fundamental principles of conservatism. She makes a compelling case for how the GOP can right itself and capture the allegiance of this group.

Hoover, Margaret (July 2011). American Individualism: How a New Generation of Conservatives Can Save the Republican Party (Hardbound e. New York: Crown Forum. p. 272. ISBN 978-0307718150. New Yorkers in journalism.

American Individualism-How a New Generation of Conservatives Can Save the Republican Party, by Margaret Hoover. While working on the 2004 Bush-Cheney reelection campaign team, Fox News contributor Margaret Hoover came to a stark realization: On gay rights, reproductive freedom, immigration, and environmentalism, the Republican party was falling seriously out of step with a rising generation of Americans. the ‘millennials’ (pp. ix, x). orn roughly between the.

Personal Name: Hoover, Margaret. Corporate Name: Republican Party (. Crown Forum, (c)2011. Includes bibliographical references (p. 225-248). 1854- ). Rubrics: Conservatism United States Generation Y.

American Individualism : How a New Generation of Conservatives Can Save the Republican Party. Margaret Hoover has been a lifelong member of the Republican Party. She grew up a self-described "ditto head. She worked in the White House for President George W. Bush. She also happens to be the great-granddaughter of the thirty-first president of the United States, Herbert Hoover.

Margaret Hoover, a conservative, and John Avlon, an independent, are . Years ago, she wrote American Individualism: How a New Generation of Conservatives Can Save the Republicans, a handbook for renovating the Republican Party (and his legacy)

Margaret Hoover, a conservative, and John Avlon, an independent, are television pundits who are married to each other. Quite happily, if a recent visit to their Gramercy Park apartment is any measure. Years ago, she wrote American Individualism: How a New Generation of Conservatives Can Save the Republicans, a handbook for renovating the Republican Party (and his legacy). It pairs the tenets of Hooverism with a focus on millennials. Partisanship as a shield was also baked into her upbringing in Denver.

She is the best selling author of the book American Individualism: How A New Generation of Conservatives Can Save the Republican Party published by Crown Forum in July 2011.

Talk about American Individualism: How a New Generation of Conservatives Can Save the Republican Party


Truthcliff
Margaret Hoover gave background on American History...politics looking at both parties objectivity ...Herbert Hoover her great grandfather had a huge impression on her ..his strong belief in American Individualism...she addresses all the major issues facing Americans and how they are effecting the citizens especially the millennials. Looking for solutions to the issues,knowing that both parties need to stop fighting between themselves. The milennials (1980-1999) want answers and solutions to problems from the debt to education,military,the border..its there generation that is left holding the bill for all these costly programs. A must read for all Americans that want our freedoms to be here for the next generations to come.
Walan
Fantastic book by what may be the only pro choice, pro LGBT Republican. Definitely hAve become a fan
Armin
Exemplary book.
WUNDERKIND
This is a well written, interesting, and potentially important and influential book. Its theme is that the Republican Party is on the verge of losing an entire generation of voters for life - but, doesn't have to. "Millennials" comprise a fifty million strong generation of Americans born roughly between the years 1980 and 1999. They voted 2-1 for Barack Obama in 2008, but are disenchanted with his presidency and Ms. Hoover believes they could be in play for the Republican Party in 2012 and beyond. But, they are suspicious of and even repelled by the old-style social conservatism of the Republican Party. She believes they can only be attracted to the party by a Ronald Reagan-style big tent approach that emphasizes the bedrock principles of individual liberty that all conservatives can agree on.

Margaret Hoover is probably the only writer on the planet who would begin an appeal to twenty-something voters by defending the record and beliefs of Herbert Hoover. But, she is his great granddaughter, and she deserves a little leniency to make her case for the rehabilitation of his image. Although it seems a little out of place it's an interesting chapter and she makes an admirable attempt to connect his conservative beliefs to the approach she believes can unite modern conservatives. (The title of her book is taken from an essay he wrote in 1922.)

Chapter two is a very interesting brief overview of all the conservative "tribes". It's an enlightening quick read on the history of conservative thought and how all the different brands of conservatism came to attach themselves to the Republican Party.

Chapter three is the best chapter in the book. It is a detailed introduction to the Millenial generation and their life experiences and attitudes. It is an eye-opening look at a generation that looks at the world completely differently than their parents' and grandparents' and even the Gen-x'ers just ahead of them. Even the most traditional social conservatives have to take notice of the obvious fact that the Republican Party is not going to win the votes of this generation by preaching to them about gay-marriage, abortion, and immigration, or by ridiculing protection of the environment and even evolution.

Where Ms. Hoover believes the party can appeal to the Millenials is by appealing to their strong belief in individual liberty and by emphasizing to them that current economic policies amount to "generational theft" (chapter four). The Millenials in a nutshell are economic conservatives and social libertarians - a combination that Ms. Hoover believes should form the tent under which conservatives of all stripes can gather. The remaining chapters of the twelve in her book cover individual issues and how she believes the Republican Party can appeal to Millenials and still stay true to the bedrock principles of limited government, free market capitalism, individual liberty, and individual responsibility. She covers gay rights, education reform, women's rights, the pro-choice/pro-life debate, environmentalism, immigration, national security - and how conservatives can take principled stands on these issues and still appeal to the Millenials.

She closes with a chapter on American Exceptionalism - which she believes in - and how Millenials can be convinced to believe in it, also (they mostly don't, now). This is a very well written book and a good read - that explores an approach to the Millenial generation that the Republicans ignore at their peril. It's easy to disagree with some of Margaret Hoover's views on individual issues. But, if her characterization of a generation of fifty million is accurate - I believe it is - it's hard to see how the Republican Party can win elections much farther into the future by failing to win over this generation of voters. She calls for a big tent that will hold all the tribes of conservatism united on the principle of individual liberty - American individualism. It's a book worth reading and an idea worth considering.
Urreur
With the political philosophy expounded by her great grandfather Herbert Hoover in his original 1922 American Individualism as a "template," Margaret Hoover has proposed an innovative new direction for the Republican Party - to become a consistent defender of individual liberty. Significantly, she correctly asserts, the party must expunge the social authoritarianism of the Religious Right, including its opposition to reproductive freedom for women and marriage equality for gays and lesbians. If the Republican Party is to stand for individual freedom, it must stand for both economic and social freedom, and these premises underpin her proposed political platform for the party. This formula can draw in younger voters (the "millennials"), unite the myriad conservative factions, and lead to a Republican resurgence, she holds. For this courageous stance, she has been denounced by some establishment conservatives as a RINO - Republican in Name Only. But, she retorts, the party is currently headed for "irrelevance" unless it adopts "American individualism as [its] integrating philosophy. The political payoff of consistency in the matter of individual freedom of choice," says Hoover, "will be enormous."

I've given Ms. Hoover four stars mainly for political innovativeness. Unfortunately, the missing fifth star is a huge one - her failure to uphold individualism as a moral ideal. Instead, her central principle is "rugged individualism imbued with a community spirit:" "imbued," that is, with "responsibility to serve his or her community ... and country." Although she herself doesn't use the term, given her acknowledged inspiration it's clear that Hoover is speaking here of altruism. In his 1922 book, Herbert Hoover explicitly upholds the "ideal" of altruism as a part of individualism. Ms. Hoover greatly weakens her case for freedom by emulating her great grandfather in this regard; justifying individualism through altruistic "tempering", which she calls "community spirit." But individualism and altruism are antipodes.

Individualism recognizes each individual as the owner of his/her own life, with the pursuit of his own goals, values, purposes, welfare, and happiness by his own independent mind and efforts, as his moral right. Altruism holds the good of others, not oneself, as every individual's moral obligation and purpose. Individualism requires and leads to individual rights, free markets, and limited, rights-protecting government. Altruism leads to group supremacy and omnipotent, redistributionist government. By attempting to reconcile these two premises, Ms. Hoover fractures her case, pulling it apart in opposite directions like a tug-of-war. On the one hand, she upholds essential elements of a free society, such as the "individual[`s] freedom ... to make moral choices on his or her own behalf; ...to make the best use of his or her creative spark, and to enjoy the benefits of hard work and special talents; ... [and to accept] responsibility ... for the choices he or she makes." At the same time, she upholds the validity of the "principles that the New Deal and Great Society programs introduced;" principles that statists advance in the name of "social welfare" or the "common good" and that deny the individual freedom in such important personal realms as retirement planning (Social Security), healthcare (Medicare and by extension ObamaCare), and charity (Medicaid, and later SCHIP)." Hoover's unfortunate contradiction awards statists a potent weapon - the moral high ground.

Given individualism's inherently egoistic nature, Republicans would do better to fuse "American Individualism" with the ethics of rational self-interest advanced in the groundbreaking moral theories of philosopher Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged), whom Hoover credits as a "leading light" of modern conservatism only in the narrow category of "economic libertarianism." But Rand, who rejected "libertarianism," was about much more than free markets: She was a moral revolutionary, and in this regard has much to offer pro-freedom elements of American conservatism and liberty advocates generally. Among her major philosophic contributions is a badly needed systematic moral defense of individualism, free market capitalism, and the Founding Fathers' revolutionary political ideals.

Despite the serious ethical contradiction inherent in her central thesis, however, Hoover is a political innovator who seeks to point the GOP in the right direction, and deserves strong - albeit qualified - support from liberty lovers. Both within the GOP and in the nation at large, her proposal could reorient America's political debate around the central conflict - individualism vs. collectivism. It could infuse our politics with a broad, vital debate on ethics, the rights of the individual, the proper role of government, and the fundamental nature of individualism itself. By calling on the GOP to be a principled, consistent advocate of individualism - even a significantly flawed conception of it - we may finally get "a choice not an echo" against the Obama Democrats' crusading collectivism. Should the GOP be serious and farsighted enough to adopt Hoover's basic strategy, we may begin to turn America's political tide away from the approaching abyss of totalitarian socialism.
Zuser
Margaret Hoover explains the ideas of youth so well. I recommend this book to all Republicans and I don't stop there, as all could find it interesting and well written!! Especially Republicans should take note if the Grand Ole Party is to survive.
Skilkancar
Since I had just read David Mamet's "The Secret Knowledge," when I began to read "American Individualism" I was amazed to find Ms. Hoover's writing more succinct, more interesting and more effective. Similar themes of individualism reverberate through both books, but Ms. Hoover's conclusions are practical, specific, and, most important, interesting. I will give this book to many friends.