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Download Flight From Woman ePub

by Karl Stern

Download Flight From Woman ePub
  • ISBN 0913757519
  • ISBN13 978-0913757512
  • Language English
  • Author Karl Stern
  • Publisher Paragon House; Reprint edition (May 1, 1998)
  • Pages 310
  • Formats lrf txt rtf lit
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Social Sciences
  • Size ePub 1163 kb
  • Size Fb2 1167 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 144

Dr. Stern’s The Flight from Woman is a study of the polarity of the sexes as reflected in the conflict between two modes of knowledge–scientific or rational, as contrasted with intuitive or poetic. In exploring this rich theme, he undertakes the psychological portraits of six representative figures whose thought and work have influenced modern man: Descartes, Goethe, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Tolstoy, and Sartre.

The scientific revolution of the last 300 years has yielded, in Dr. Stern’s view, a de-ferninization and de-humanization of society, in the sense that it is a rejection of the kind of wisdom, called sophia, that is comprehended intuitively. “If we equate the one-sidedly rational and technical with the masculine,” he states, “there arises the ghastly specter of a world impoverished of womanly values.”

A deeply original work, The Flight from Woman goes far beyond psychology in its analysis of the malaise of our time.


Karl Stern argues in this book that the divide between the two is a fairly recent development in human history, starting from Descartes's distinction between the material (res extensa or extended things) and the spiritual (res cogitans or thinking things). Cartesians see the divide as unbridgeable and that the res extensa is the mathematically verifiable, sure knowledge.

The Flight from Woman - Stern, Karl. Admirers of The Pillar of Fire and The Third Revolution will find even greater insight and compassion in Dr Stern's new hook exploring the hidden sources of anti-feminist writing in Europe from Schopenhauer to Sartre.

The Flight from Woman is a book by psychiatrist Karl Stern, first published in 1965 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. It is described as a study of the polarity of the sexes as reflected in the conflict between two modes of knowledge - scientific or rational, as contrasted with intuitive or poetic.

Flight From Woman book. Karl Stern also examines the lives and works of Tolstoy This book is immensely valuable especially if you are interested in psychoanalysis and the history of philosophy, ideas. With impeccable insight and analysis, we are treated to biographical sketches and psychological portraits of some of the greatest minds of Western thought and civilization, including the father of modern philosophy Descartes and his many intellectual heirs in the shapes and guises of Schopenhauer, Sartre and Kierkegaard.

Dr. Stern's The Flight from Woman is a study of the polarity of the sexes as reflected in the conflict between two modes of or rational, as contrasted with intuitive or poetic. In exploring this rich theme, he undertakes the psychological portraits of six representative figures whose thought and work have influenced modern man: Descartes, Goethe, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Tolstoy, and Sartre.

Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1965 - Knowledge, Theory of - 310 pages. Bibliographic information. The Flight from Woman. From inside the book. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1965.

Stern's The Flight from Woman is a study of the polarity of the sexes as reflected in the conflict between two modes of kwledge-scientific or rational, as contrasted with intuitive or poetic. In exploring this rich theme, he undertakes the psychological portraits of six representative figures whose thought and work have influenced modern man: Descartes, Goethe, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Tolstoy, and Sartre

Download Now. saveSave Karl Stern Flight From Woman For Later. Dr. Sterns book is not a work that dis- penses panacea.

Download Now. Karl Stern Flight From Woman. Uploaded by. Sarban Malhans. Stern’s The Flight from Woman is a study of the polarity of the sexes as reflected in the conflict between two modes of knowledge–scientific or rational, as contrasted with intuitive or poetic.

Paragon House Publishers.

Sterns The Flight from Woman is a study of the polarity of the sexes as reflected in the conflict between two modes of or rational, as contrasted with intuitive or poetic. Paragon House Publishers.

Talk about Flight From Woman


Anardred
A scholarly well written book largely about the influence of women (in the role of MOTHER) had on their (to become remembered in history) children;
and the effect those children had on the the world of today. A fascinating book.
IWAS
Extremely interesting work that I've been wanting to read for a long time now. I really liked this edition.
lucky kitten
I can not recommend this book more highly. It is a MUST READ for anyone who cares about our culture.
An undersanding of the polarities which Dr. Stern so beautifully and deeply explores
goes a long way in understanding today's cultural climate in which, for instance,
violence against women is the number one health issue in the United States,
in which 25% of all women will experience violence by the time they are twenty five,
and in which this is denied, dismissed, ignored, or shrugged off.
By going beyond psychology in his analysis of the conditon of our time,
Dr. Stern elucidates the influences which have spawned
the climate in which this social evil can survive.

This is but one issue, of course, which can be viewed through the microscope of Dr. Stern's remarkable investigation.

Another arena of concern (among many) is that "politically correct" polarity which is in opposition to any other mode of knowledge except that of the scientific and rational, that most sterile, unfortunate bias that clouds and distorts education in the United States.

How thoroughly saturated our conditon is with the polarization which Dr. Stern brings to light is astonishing.

"If we equate the one-sidedly rational and technical with the masculine, there arises the ghastly spectre of a world impoverished by womanly values."

Dr. Stern's profound depth and extraorinary compassion is a monumental contribution to caring for mankind.
Kamuro
Good
Aurizar
The book starts off well enough with the division of epistemology into a analytical form with the author calls masculine and an intuitive form he calls feminine. He than tries to show the abandonment of the feminine form starting with the dualism of Desecrate to Schopenhauer but than gets side tracked from his theme by Sartre. I had to stop reading by the time he got to Goethe.
Whitehammer
Two forms of knowing are commonly contrasted. On one hand is scientific, rational, discursive knowledge, the sort represented by the classical syllogism "All men are mortal, Socrates is a man, therefore Socrates is mortal." On the other hand is intuitive or poetic knowledge, the sort represented by the "lightbulb" moment when an idea becomes crystal clear instantly. Scientific knowledge breaks down a thing into its parts and sees how it is put together from an objective viewpoint. Intuition takes in the thing as it is and immediately grasps one or more characteristics of the thing. The first knowing is typically considered masculine and the second feminine. Which is not to say that discursive reasoning is only done by men and intuition is only done by women. But that is how they are stereotypically identified. In the modern era, credit for "real" knowledge is given almost exclusively to discursive reasoning (especially for its basis in mathematics, a field with unquestioned objectivity). Intuition is considered unreliable and suspect.

Karl Stern argues in this book that the divide between the two is a fairly recent development in human history, starting from Descartes's distinction between the material (res extensa or extended things) and the spiritual (res cogitans or thinking things). Cartesians see the divide as unbridgeable and that the res extensa is the mathematically verifiable, sure knowledge. Stern gives a thorough examination of Descartes' writings and his life to show both that Descartes would probably disagree with his followers and that he gives poetic knowledge the same certainty even if it is subject to different criteria of estimation. Stern gives an extensive psychological analysis of Descartes that is informative and persuasive.

Stern examines the lives and the writings of many other famous figures after Descartes (Goethe, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Tolstoy, Ibsen, and Sartre) to develop his theme further, namely that the divide between the two forms of knowing leads to problems. Those figures all have challenging interactions with women in their lives (sometimes mothers, sometimes wives and lovers, sometimes others) that have an impact on their work. By the time of Sartre, intuitive knowledge of things is a thing that leaves him with nausea.

Stern ultimately concludes that the conflict and the evaluation is false. Rather than being opposite or irreconcilable ways of knowing, Stern sees reason and intuition as complementary. They can come to the same truth in different ways and can fill in the weaknesses of each other. Intuition can grasp things that are beyond the scope of scientific reason, beyond the merely quantifiable. And they have equal validity (even if they do not share the same process of validation). Stern agrees that the rational/mathematical inclination is stronger in men and the intuitive inclination is stronger in women. But both sexes are capable of both ways of knowing and merely focusing on one way of knowing is limiting, if not harmful to the knower. Integrating the two is a way to greater personal harmony and happiness.

Stern writes from a psychoanalytical and phenomenological perspective. Thus his writing is sometimes technical. Keep a dictionary nearby. Also, he is well read in western literature and thought which also required occasional research on my part (I know about Faust and Don Juan but Ahasver and Hedda Gabler are new to me). The effort is well worth the rewarding insights found in this book.