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Download Race Rebels : Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class ePub

by Robin D. G. Kelley

Download Race Rebels : Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class ePub
  • ISBN 0684826399
  • ISBN13 978-0684826394
  • Language English
  • Author Robin D. G. Kelley
  • Publisher Free Press (June 1, 1996)
  • Pages 357
  • Formats mobi mbr docx rtf
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Social Sciences
  • Size ePub 1949 kb
  • Size Fb2 1792 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 741

Robin D. G. Kelley is professor of history and Africana studies at New York University and author of Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression (1990).

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In Race Rebels, Robin . Kelley sets out to examine black working-class politics from way, way below. Focusing on an under-examined group, the working poor, he delves into their quotidian interactions and relational networks to examine how they exercised power. Focusing on an under-examined group, the working poor, he delves into their quotidian interactions and relational networks to examine how they exercised power

Many black strategies of daily resistance have been obscured-until now. Race rebels, argues Kelley, have created strategies of resistance, movements, and entire subcultures

Many black strategies of daily resistance have been obscured-until now. Race rebels, argues Kelley, have created strategies of resistance, movements, and entire subcultures. Here, for the first time, everyday race rebels are given the historiographical attention they deserve, from the Jim Crow era to the present.

Robin D. G. Kelley is professor of history and Africana studies at New York University and author of Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression (1990). talks about little known portions of US history. com User, February 4, 2006. Kelley highlights an underappreciated portion of twentieth century American history - the intersection of the Negro working class with the simultaneous aspects of race and class. His book delves into the interwar period, and brings back almost forgotten archives and memories. The influence of Marxist thought on some Negro activists is shown.

Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class is a 1994 non-fiction book by American writer Robin D. Kelley. The book, a cohesive adaptation of several articles previously published by Kelley, concerns the impact made by black members of the American working class on American politics and culture. Kelley's work does not focus solely on race, but considers the compound impact of race, class and gender.

The term ""race rebels"" is too elastic, ranging from workers hovering above or below the . Pub Date: Nov. 15th, 1994.

The term ""race rebels"" is too elastic, ranging from workers hovering above or below the poverty line to those unmoored by lack of employment or stable families into youthful nihilism (such as Malcolm X in his ""zoot suit"" hustler days and ""gangsta"" tappers, a group to which the author ascribes inordinate importance). Kelley breezily dismisses as bourgeois such analysts of the ""underclass"" as William Julius Wilson.

Institutional definitions of underclass black masculinity described it as pathological and were concerned almost.

According to Robin D. Kelley in Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class, gangsta rap i. window into, and critique of, the criminalization of black youth (185). Pimps, drug dealers, and other hustlers inhabit the world that many of the artists exposed on their albums and in their videos. Many of the artists use these characters to create spaces for redefinition of the self. Institutional definitions of underclass black masculinity described it as pathological and were concerned almost exclusively with criminality.

Race rebels, argues Kelley, have created strategies of resistance, movements, and entire subcultures. Kieli: Englanti Kategoria: Dekkarit Kääntäjä: Lisätietoa e-kirjasta: Julkaisija: Free Press Julkaisuvuosi: 1996-06-01 ISBN: 9781439105047. Samankaltaisia kirjoja. Format Paperback 384 pages. Dimensions 156 x 235 x 20mm 336g. Publication date 01 Jun 1996. Publisher SIMON & SCHUSTER.

The book, a cohesive adaptation of several articles previously published by Kelley, concerns the impact made by black members of the American working class on American politics and culture

The book, a cohesive adaptation of several articles previously published by Kelley, concerns the impact made by black members of the American working class on American politics and culture.

Talk about Race Rebels : Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class


Cemav
This book could have been split up into chapters and read separately. There was no fluidity to it. I wouldn't say to never read it, but it was not my favorite style of writing.
Ffleg
This book has a really good information about African American history.
Zovaithug
Excellent condition! Thanks!
Celore
book does appear used but still acceptable. packaging was good. this was for my history class and it arrived on time
Lemana
In Race Rebels, Robin D.G. Kelley sets out to examine black working-class politics from “way, way below.” Focusing on an under-examined group, the working poor, he delves into their quotidian interactions and relational networks to examine how they exercised power. Kelley’s analysis depends on a redefinition of politics to include not just what happens through recognized institutions and organizations but encompasses the work habits, priorities, conversations, as well as less “respectable forms of protest such as “foot dragging, to sabotage, theft at the workplace to absenteeism, cursing to graffiti.” By re-conceptualizing “politics” as “infrapolitics”, he avoids linking political activity solely to established institutions and looks for the ways the working-class used its circumscribed power for the best possible results. Kelley’s study re-calibrates how we think about power and the culture of the black working class.
Still In Mind
Kelley highlights an underappreciated portion of twentieth century American history - the intersection of the Negro working class with the simultaneous aspects of race and class. His book delves into the interwar period, and brings back almost forgotten archives and memories.

The influence of Marxist thought on some Negro activists is shown. To the extent that the American Communist Party received significant membership from Negroes. At the time, it was one of the few relatively colour-blind organisations. Of course, this very fact was used against the Communists and Negro activists by segregationists.

The book has numerous nuggets of history that might have often been omitted from other texts. Thus, you may well have heard of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, which fought for the Spanish Republic during its civil war. But did you know that in that brigade were over 70 Negroes? Who saw the war as an extension of a war on racism and poverty, in Africa and the US. Kelley shows gives us their motivations and how they fared.
Tekasa
Have you ever, when reading something, seen a reference to another book that makes you want to read it? Then when you get around to reading it, you realize that, with the first reference, you learned everything you wanted to know about the book? That was my experience with this book. I don't even remember where I read a reference to Robin D.G. Kelley's Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class, but I know my life would not be less rich had I not read it.

This is not to say it's a bad book. It's a book that serves a function, fills a niche. Kelley writes as an academic (professor of history and Africana studies at NYU at the time of publication, now professor of American studies and ethnicity and history at USC), so the book is heavy on documentation and light on readability. (For 227 pages of text, there are 65 pages of end notes, a 37 page bibliography, and a 15 page index. But who's counting.) With that tone and purpose in mind, the reader can still glean an interesting take on civil rights and black history in the U.S.

In a relatively small space, Kelley covers a lot of ground. I enjoyed his recounting of, in a sense, the underbelly of the civil rights movement. We all know about Martin Luther King, the march on Washington, and the high-profile civil rights leaders. Kelley reveals the under-the-radar civil rights movement. Many workers, whether domestics, dock workers, field workers, etc., performed their own small acts of workplace rebellion, including industrial sabotage, workplace theft, and simple loafing. By doing so, they claimed ownership of their own time and persons, rejecting the role of slave.

I particularly liked the description of domestic workers taking, with the implied consent of their employers, food ("pan-toting"), clothing and utensils for their own use. One worker said, "We don't steal; we just 'take' things--they are part of the oral contract, exprest [sic] or implied. We understand it, and most of the white folks understand it." I was reminded of the biblical practice of gleaning, which required farmers to leave the corners of the field unharvested, or leave some grapes or olives ungathered, so that the poor can gather some for their own use.

Another favorite part was the description of the ongoing, decentralized bus protests, specifically in Birmingham. Give Rosa Parks her due, of course, but she was by no means the first, and certainly not the only one to thwart the bus segregation policy. Many did, on a daily basis. Particularly troubling was the treatment of black servicemen, who fought against racist policies overseas, only to come home and be told to move to the back of the bus.

Later on, as the civil rights movement became tied to the Communist Party, I began to lose a sense of solidarity. I can appreciate the point, that many African Americans do not share a commitment to American values, given the way they have been treated historically and in the present day, but it seems like African Americans should look at the alternatives: Communism, which oppresses all people as a matter of course, or American democracy, which has unfairly oppressed a minority but has taken great strides towards true equality. I have little patience for those who side with Communism, black or white.

I also did not enjoy Kelley's laudatory analysis of "gansta rap." I understand, as best a white man can, that blacks suffer from unfair treatment, and that there are discriminatory practices in law enforcement (see my review of Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow), and that places like South Central L.A. have become occupied territories under police rule. But gangsta rap, when it celebrates cop killers, lauds illegal activity, and then demeans women, should be condemned, not praised, even if it is a heart-felt expression of the experiences of poor, inner-city blacks.

As a country, we are a long way from being free of contentious race discussions in our public discourse. Race Rebels reminds us that, even though church leaders and middle class and wealthy blacks may dominate discussions of race, the working class and poor blacks in our nation are the ones who really move the culture toward racial equality.