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Download They Left Great Marks on Me: African American Testimonies of Racial Violence from Emancipation to World War I ePub

Download They Left Great Marks on Me: African American Testimonies of Racial Violence from Emancipation to World War I ePub
  • ISBN 0814784860
  • ISBN13 978-0814784860
  • Language English
  • Formats lit lrf mbr azw
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Social Sciences
  • Size ePub 1272 kb
  • Size Fb2 1265 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 807


Williams analyzes one means by which African Americans resisted the brutalities of white violence from 1865 .

Williams analyzes one means by which African Americans resisted the brutalities of white violence from 1865 through the 1920s and the impact of this activity to support the subsequent successes of the post-WWII civil rights movements.

In this evocative and deeply moving history Kidada Williams examines African Americans’ testimonies about racial violence

In this evocative and deeply moving history Kidada Williams examines African Americans’ testimonies about racial violence. By using both oral and print culture to testify about violence, victims and witnesses hoped they would be able to graphically disseminate enough knowledge about its occurrence and inspire Americans to take action to end it. In the process of testifying, these people created a vernacular history of the violence they endured and witnessed, as well as the identities that grew from the experience of violence.

Well after slavery was abolished, its legacy of violence left deep wounds on African Americans' bodies, minds, and lives. For many victims and witnesses of the assaults, rapes, murders, nightrides, lynchings, and other bloody acts that followed, the suffering this violence engendered was at once too painful to put into words yet too horrible to suppress. In this evocative Well after slavery was abolished, its legacy of violence left deep wounds on African Americans' bodies, minds, and lives.

They broke me teetotally up. I left my things and they would not allow me to go back there, and I had to slip back . African Americans embraced freedom with hopes befitting centuries of enslavement. I left my things and they would not allow me to go back there, and I had to slip back and get my wife and children the best I could. After the Civil War they were ready to make their ascent, to rise above the despair of slavery, and to soar with whites on the wings of American freedom and citizenship. Black people snatched opportunities to abandon rural farms and plantations or urban hotels and factories as federal officials adopted policies to institutionalize abolition.

Home Browse Books Book details, They Left Great Marks on Me. .The resulting crusades against racial violence became one of the political training grounds for the civil rights movement.

Home Browse Books Book details, They Left Great Marks on Me: African American. They Left Great Marks on Me: African American Testimonies of Racial Violence from Emancipation to World War I. By Kidada E. Williams. Well after slavery was abolished, its legacy of violence left deep wounds on African Americans' bodies, minds, and lives. They broke me teetotally up.

Williamss superlative interpretation of AfricanAmerican responses to racial violence should be readby all interested in the histories of. American lynchingand the African American experience

Kidada Williams "They Left Great Marks on Me: African American Testimonies of Racial Violence from Emancipation to World War 1" (NYU Press, 2012).

Kidada Williams "They Left Great Marks on Me: African American Testimonies of Racial Violence from Emancipation to World War 1" (NYU Press, 2012). Cherstin M. Lyon "Prisons and Patriots: Japanese American Wartime Citizenship, Civil Disobedience, and Historical Memory" (Temple University Press, 2011).

They Left Great Marks on Me: African American Testimonies of Racial Violence from Emancipation to World War I. New York, New York: New York University Press.

Cravath Simpson (December 6, 1860 – May 19, 1945) was an African-American activist and public speaker. After beginning her career as a singer, she studied to become a podiatrist, but is most known for her work to uplift the black community and combat lynching. Though she was based in Boston, Simpson spoke throughout the Northeastern and Midwestern United States urging recognition of the human rights of black citizens. ISBN 978-0-8147-9537-8.

Talk about They Left Great Marks on Me: African American Testimonies of Racial Violence from Emancipation to World War I


Beazerdred
Very early on in the reading, I began to wonder if the way that my history classes covered the US Civil War and Reconstruction was portrayed the same way elsewhere in the country. I grew up and was educated in a former Confederate state, but I don't remember any teacher or professor trumpeting the cause for States' Rights or making any attempt to find nobility in enslaving other humans. A lot of attention in the textbooks and class discussion was given to the war itself however: to battle strategies and mini-biographies of the generals and leaders of both sides. Reconstruction was rather rushed over and woven with hints of unrealistic promises and rampant corruption by outsiders rushing in to make a profit.

"They Left Great Marks on Me..." gives another perspective. In its well-sourced accounts, formerly enslaved people and their descendants worked long hours to farm land, educate themselves and their children, and do their civic duty to vote. In reading details of the damage done to their houses and fields, one appreciates how hard families had to work for their harvests and to recoup their expenses, and the difficulty they had in finding redress for unfair compensation and pricing structures. If there was widespread corruption during or after Reconstruction, it was more likely by those who cheated their sharecroppers, or engaged in unfair credit practices.

Over time, according to accounts taken from survivors, cheating disintegrated into violence and physical attacks if they attempted to protect their interests. Night Riders used the horribly euphemistic term "charitable exile" as the grim alternative to a targeted farmer who had a successful crop ready to harvest: flee the area now and leave everything behind or be beaten and murdered in front of your family. Sometimes the family was murdered along with the head of the household. If any took refuge in neighboring houses, or attempted to protest or report the violence, they and those who assisted them were also targeted according to the records that the book cites. This went on for decades with little intervention by local courts or federal authorities. Lynching became so widespread that it spurred the Great Migration and eventually became a national scandal.

If one considers the deaths of so many, over so wide an area, the thought occurs that surely there had to be some strenuous wrestling of consciences among those who considered themselves the more enlightened and noble of the races. Even if we consider these men in the context of their culture and time, would the fact that they did what they did in the dark offer some possibility that deep down they knew they were wrong and wished to stop? Did those covering themselves with masks and sheets ever wish they were not summoned or pressured to go? Did they ever discuss it with family or friends? One hopes for at least a soul-sick need for a deathbed confession or fear-of-hell sourced remorse for those who considered love and mercy integral parts of their professed faith.

I wish there were some accounts of this, in family stories or diaries or something to give me a little more faith in my fellow man. Because reading the later accounts of public hangings, open mob violence, and resistance to outside investigation leads me with little reassurance.

I have to accept that it stopped only because of the individual heroism of African-American investigators, writers, and their white allies who risked their lives to document the deaths and report them over and over again until the nation could no longer turn away and pretend it was an exaggeration of isolated cases. And that makes me wonder if the fear, greed, and hatred at the root of such socially-sanctioned terrorism (which is what it was, whether the word terrorism was coined then or not) never completely went away. Rather, those rages went underneath the surface when there was finally resistance from our better natures. And if so, are we catching glimpses of them bubbling up again? And do we have a better way to stop it this time around?

I find it hard to rate books like this. How do you give 5 stars that say "I loved it!" to unrelenting accounts of widespread lynching and systematic terror? I had to put it down several times, and read fast through some sections. I don't know if it was the way it was written, my state of mind, or the topic. I didn't love it, but I'm glad that I read it.
watchman
Williams's scholarship puts a focus on exactly what has been glossed over for more than a century by historians: the violence of white vigilante groups and the consequences of that violence on African Americans. For too long the centrality of vigilante violence by white supremacists has gone unrecognized in both popular and official historical narratives, resulting in a myopic, self-serving interpretation of the Reconstruction era and the terrors that went into the creation of Jim Crow. Williams's work not only identifies and challenges this historiographical "oversight," but she does so by replacing it with solid research and historical scholarship.
Rko
"A must read for anyone interested in black history, social justice, or American history. It should be on every undergrad and grad's reading list - and every professor's. The research is unbelievably extensive; the methodology staightforward yet innovative. Williams has unearthed previously ignored sources and turned them into an engrossing, accessible narrative that changes the way one looks at racial relations in America. No matter how devastating the facts, she maintains objectivity and lets readers draw their own conclusions. I can't recommend this book more highly."
Weiehan
Wow, for someone like me who only has a superficial knowledge of what African Americans when through at the early stages of the civil rights struggle, this book is indispensable. What an eye-opener! Thanks, Prof Williams, for bringing attention to these heroes and their contributions and for educating us all. The stories you tell are depressing, yet so inspiring. What courage these victims had. And thanks for writing so clearly and engaging. When is your next book coming out??
Tto
Kidada Williams' authoritative study of how sustained and repeated racial violence shaped African American life after the Civil War is an important addition to American history. The subject of white violence against African Americans is hardly new, but Williams breaks new ground by focusing on how representations of racial violence shaped a sense of collective identity among American blacks during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Central to the study are the voices of the victims themselves, from ex-slaves in the Reconstruction era to early civil rights agitators and intellectuals in the early twentieth century. The writing is clear and relaxed; this would be a valuable text for undergraduate or graduate courses.
Manazar
This book lays out the story of continuing violence experienced by African Americans after the age of slavery. A must-read for anyone who believes that the end of slavery was the end of the injustice.
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