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Download Coming Out in Christianity: Religion, Identity, and Community ePub

by Melissa M. Wilcox

Download Coming Out in Christianity: Religion, Identity, and Community ePub
  • ISBN 0253342783
  • ISBN13 978-0253342782
  • Language English
  • Author Melissa M. Wilcox
  • Publisher Indiana University Press (October 3, 2003)
  • Pages 240
  • Formats azw lit mbr lrf
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Social Sciences
  • Size ePub 1631 kb
  • Size Fb2 1983 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 914

For many Christians, "homosexuality" is an issue. It is often considered a matter of "us" versus "them," or worse, for gay men and women, a question of their behavior, not something intrinsic to their identity. Coming Out in Christianity examines this conflict from the point of view of a group of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Christians. It focuses on current and former members of two Metropolitan Community Churches in California that serve predominantly LGBT Christians. Based on original research, including more than 70 in-depth interviews, the book explores life histories, current beliefs, cultural settings, and community influences to learn what helped each forge an identity as both gay and Christian. These powerful case studies will help to deepen our understanding of both religion and personal identity.


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Coming Out in Christianity book. For many Christians, homosexuality is an issue  . Start by marking Coming Out in Christianity: Religion, Identity, and Community as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Their experience in Christianity is sometimes dissimilar to that of gay men, although lesbianism has also traditionally been considered . Wilcox, Melissa M. (2003). Coming out in Christianity: religion, identity, and community. Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0-253-21619-9.

Their experience in Christianity is sometimes dissimilar to that of gay men, although lesbianism has also traditionally been considered a sin within the religion. However, some contemporary Christian denominations, like the United Church of Christ and the Metropolitan Community Church, do not hold this belief. They accept lesbian parishioners, perform same-sex marriages, and ordain women who are in same-sex relationships.

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Melissa M. Wilcox is Visiting Johnston Professor of Religion at Whitman College. I read this book when it first came out, when I was in college, and it fundamentally changed how I thought about the relationship between queer sexuality and religion.

Coming Out in Christianity examines this conflict from the point of view of a group of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Christians. Melissa M. It focuses on current and former members of two Metropolitan Community Churches in California that serve predominantly LGBT Christians.

Melissa Wilcox addresses this issue from both the secular and the religious side. As one who has kept track of developments in the gay community, Wilcox knows that identities have become more complex since the 1970s

Melissa Wilcox addresses this issue from both the secular and the religious side. As one who has kept track of developments in the gay community, Wilcox knows that identities have become more complex since the 1970s. In addition to gay men and lesbians, there are bisexuals and transgender people who may exist between gender identities or be in the process of transition from one to the other.

2003) Coming Out in Christianity: Religion, Identity and. Community, Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Wishik, H. and Pierce, C. (1995) Sexual Identity and Orientation

2003) Coming Out in Christianity: Religion, Identity and. The remit of this article means that the religious dimension of their lives will not be foregrounded, unless when it is specifically related to the issues discussed. For publications that prioritize the religious dimension, see Toft (2009aToft (, 2009bToft (, 2012bToft (, 2014). Intimacy negotiated: The management of relationships and the construction of personal communities in the lives of bisexual women and men. Article.

Religion can be a central part of one’s identity The rules are not laid out in black and white anymore-you find a. .I feel really connected with my Jewish community, but a little less connected to the observance factor of my religion.

Religion can be a central part of one’s identity. The word religion comes from a Latin word that means to tie or bind together. Modern dictionaries define religion as an organized system of beliefs and rituals centering on a supernatural being or beings. The rules are not laid out in black and white anymore-you find a lot of gray area since you gain more independence as you get older. After all, you start to make your own decisions-some good, some bad-but life has to teach you its lessons somehow. I do believe in rituals.

Wilcox, Melissa M. 2003. 2009. Queer women and religious individualism. New York: Vintage Books. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. The restructuring of American religion: Society and faith since World War II. ISBN13:9780253216199.

Talk about Coming Out in Christianity: Religion, Identity, and Community


Ahieones
I read this book when it first came out, when I was in college, and it fundamentally changed how I thought about the relationship between queer sexuality and religion. Wilcox is a trailblazer in the study of religion and sexuality, and this qualitative account of MCC members remains one of the best books in the field.
Domarivip
For many Christians, "homosexuality" is an issue. It is often considered a matter of "us" versus "them," or worse, for gay men and women, a question of their behavior, not something intrinsic to their identity. This book examines this conflict from the point of view of a group of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Christians. It focuses on current and former members of two Metropolitan Community Churches in California that serve predominantly LGBT Christians. Based on original research, including more than seventy in-depth interviews, the book explores life histories, current beliefs, cultural settings, and community influences to learn what helped each forge an identity as both gay and Christian. These powerful case studies will help to deepen readers understanding of both religion and personal identity.