derrierloisirs.fr
» » Fathers Under Fire: The Revolution in Child Support Enforcement

Download Fathers Under Fire: The Revolution in Child Support Enforcement ePub

by Judith A. Seltzer,Irwin Garfinkel,Sara S. McLanahan,Daniel R. Meyer

Download Fathers Under Fire: The Revolution in Child Support Enforcement ePub

"This important and highly informative collection of studies on nonresidentfathers and child support should be of great value to scholars and policymakers alike." —American Journal of Sociology

Over half of America's children will live apart from their fathers at some point as they grow up, many in the single-mother households that increasingly make up the nation's poor. Federal efforts to improve the collection of child support from fathers appear to have little effect on payments, and many critics have argued that forcing fathers to pay does more harm than good. Much of the uncertainty surrounding child support policies has stemmed from a lack of hard data on nonresident fathers. Fathers Under Fire presents the best available information on the financial and social circumstances of the men who are at the center of the debate. In this volume, social scientists and legal scholars explore the issues underlying the child support debate, chief among them on the potential repercussions of stronger enforcement.

Who are nonresident fathers? This volume calls upon both empirical and theoretical data to describe them across a broad economic and social spectrum. Absentee fathers who do not pay child support are much more likely to be school dropouts and low earners than fathers who pay, and nonresident fathers altogether earn less than resident fathers. Fathers who start new families are not significantly less likely to support previous children. But can we predict what would happen if the government were to impose more rigorous child support laws? The data in this volume offer a clearer understanding of the potential benefits and risks of such policies. In contrast to some fears, stronger enforcement is unlikely to push fathers toward. But it does seem to have more of an effect on whether some fathers remarry and become responsible for new families. In these cases, how are subsequent children affected by a father's pre-existing obligations? Should such fathers be allowed to reduce their child support orders in order to provide for their current families? Should child support guidelines permit modifications in the event of a father's changed financial circumstances? Should government enforce a father's right to see his children as well as his obligation to pay support? What can be done to help under- or unemployed fathers meet their payments? This volume provides the information and insight to answer these questions.

The need to help children and reduce the public costs of welfare programs is clear, but the process of achieving these goals is more complex. Fathers Under Fire offers an indispensable resource to those searching for effective and equitable solutions to the problems of child support.


support enforcement on children, fathers, and new dependents of fathers with. child support obligations.

New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1998. thers facing increased child support enforcement, examining how child support. contributions (or failure to meet child support obligations) affect the lives of chil-. dren as well as the fathers themselves. support enforcement on children, fathers, and new dependents of fathers with. This section addresses the impact of child support ob

Chicago Distribution Center.

Chicago Distribution Center.

Fathers Under Fire book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Fathers Under Fire book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Fathers Under Fire: The Revolution in Child Support Enforcement as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Irwin Garfinkel, Sara S. McLanahan, Daniel R. Meyer and Judith A. Seltzer The last twenty years have witnessed fundamental change in child support enforcement in the United States. Seltzer. The American family has undergone a dramatic restructuring during the past four decades. At the beginning of the 1950s, a large majority of children in the United States lived with both of their biological parents from the time they were born to the age of maturity. Only one of five children born in the 1950s lived apart from their father before reaching adulthood. Today the picture is dramatically different. The last twenty years have witnessed fundamental change in child support enforcement in the United States.

Fathers Under Fire is intended as a first step toward public policy that reflects the interests of children, families, and .

Fathers Under Fire is intended as a first step toward public policy that reflects the interests of children, families, and society as a whole - by including the diverse perspectives and potential of non-resident fathers. Garfinkel, Irwin and McLanahan, Sara and Meyer, Daniel R. and Seltzer, Judith, Fathers Under Fire: The Revolution in Child Support Enforcement in the Usa (this Casepaper is a Summary of the Book by the Same Title and Authors, Published by the Russel Sage Foundation, 1998) (August 1998). com/abstract 1158905. Irwin Garfinkel (Contact Author).

Irwin Garfinkel Sara McLanahan. Daniel Meyer Judith Seltzer. In sum, Fathers Under Fire attempts to widen the lens fixed on child support enforcement as a public policy concern. Contents 1. Introduction 2. What are the policies and who are the fathers? 3. How does child support enforcement affect fathers? 4. Should we do more to help fathers? 5. Conclusions. Of course, the interests of mothers and children figure prominently. But the image is only complete if the fathers’ perspectives are also a part of the picture.

Fathers Under Fire argues that, as yet, the shift has neither improved the standard of living for mothers and children, nor helped the fathers to be. .Irwin Garfinkel & Sara Mclanahan & Daniel Meyer & Judith Seltzer, 1998.

Fathers Under Fire argues that, as yet, the shift has neither improved the standard of living for mothers and children, nor helped the fathers to be able to meet their obligations. Fathers under Fire: The Revolution in Child Support Enforcement in the USA (This CASEpaper is a summary of the book by the same title and authors, published by the Russel Sage Foundation, 1998)," CASE Papers case14, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE. Handle: RePEc:cep:sticas:case14.

New York: Russell Sage. Longitudinal Studies of Effects of Divorce on Children in Great Britain and the United States. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Discrepancies Between Custodial Awards and Custodial Practices: De Jure and De Facto Custody.

In this volume, social scientists and legal scholars explore the issues underlying the child support debate, chief among them on the potential repercussions of stronger enforcement. CONTRIBUTORS: Irwin Garfinkel, Sara S. Meyer, Judith A. Seltzer, David E. Bloom, Anne Case, Cecilia Conrad, Fred Doolittle, Richard B. Freeman, Thomas L. Hanson, Martha Minow, Jessica Pearson, Nancy Thoennes, and Jane Waldfogel.

Maria Aparecida Eva Cancian, Daniel R. Meyer. Irwin Garfinkel, Sara Mclanahan, Daniel R. Changes in the living arrangements of children have implications for social policy and children’s well-being. Understanding who gets custody on divorce-mother, father, or both sharing custody-ca. More). The Evolution of Family Complexity from the Perspective of Nonmarital Children.

Talk about Fathers Under Fire: The Revolution in Child Support Enforcement


Kirinaya
This book, unlike most other books which blindly focus on independent aspects of poverty and well being, succeeds in bringing together a pool of information on Fathers. I found the writing articulate and the information at worst a honed compilation of all research on the topic, and at best an excellent resource for all in the field of population studies.
Kulwes
This book is written by small, established clique with association to the Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty. Individually, each researcher has turned out years of credible research. Unfortunately, they have a reputation for deviating from credible re when arguing policy to the public and when making a case for specific reforms. The major failures of the current child support system are largely attributable to this crowd, which from the 70s have promoted the application of old Soviet Russian "welfare policy" in the United States. Perhaps the most bizarre aspect of this history, is that Congress was so willing to implement the reforms, forcing states to replace traditional Constitutionally based mechanisms for dealing with family issues.
I too, would like to rename the book. A proper title would be "Our Two Decades of Failure and the New Spin for the 21st Century: What We Want You to Believe Now".
I agree with the previous reviewer that lack of focus on the effects of child support reform at higher income levels underlies a basic failure of the book to enter current discussion in a rational way. The "success" of the authors in promoting policy reform is largely concentrated in the fact that federal "welfare laws" and welfare bureaucracy have now been extended to all income levels. Simply ignoring the most damaging effects of these reforms doesn't make them go away.
Kajishakar
This book is a composite of papers written by social scientists and legal scholars prepared for a conference in 1995. Although revised to consider criticisms and suggestions from the conference, the chapters fall short in providing significant information regarding the impact of current child support enforcement activity, as much of the most significant new government mandates occurred after these works were written. Even though the majority of enforcement activity in this country involves non-welfare related cases, this book focuses almost exclusively on fathers at or below poverty. The title of the book should have been "Low Income Fathers Under Fire". Although the chapters are interesting, none touch on the fundamental issue dealing with the economic foundation for most state guidelines. It seems to be accepted as a "given" that state review committees have "sound" bases for their respective guidelines, rather than picking them apart to ensure what is said to be "owed" by fathers is indeed appropriate. For instance, an involved father not only is responsible for a formal child support obligation, he must also spend additional money for the child's time spent with him, to which little to no credit is considered. Although father access to children is given some review in the book, very little qualitative attention is given to the subject. This could be explained by the quote in the book that defies common sense, "Children may also benefit from spending more time with nonresident parents, although the evidence for this is mixed." Throughout the book, it is pointed out repeatedly that data is slim about nonresident fathers, yet somehow there is enough to justify this compilation. Its usefulness from a practical standpoint is minimal.
Longitude Temporary
This book is written by small, established clique with association to the Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty. Individually, each researcher has turned out years of credible research. Unfortunately, they have a reputation for deviating from credible re when arguing policy to the public and when making a case for specific reforms. The major failures of the current child support system are largely attributable to this crowd, which from the 70s have promoted the application of old Soviet Russian "welfare policy" in the United States. Perhaps the most bizarre aspect of this history, is that Congress was so willing to implement the reforms, forcing states to replace traditional Constitutionally based mechanisms for dealing with family issues.
I too, would like to rename the book. A proper title would be "Our Two Decades of Failure and the New Spin for the 21st Century: What We Want You to Believe Now".
I agree with the previous reviewer that lack of focus on the effects of child support reform at higher income levels underlies a basic failure of the book to enter current discussion in a rational way. The "success" of the authors in promoting policy reform is largely concentrated in the fact that federal "welfare laws" and welfare bureaucracy have now been extended to all income levels. Simply ignoring the most damaging effects of these reforms doesn't make them go away.