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Download Walk in My Shoes: Conversations between a Civil Rights Legend and his Godson on the Journey Ahead ePub

by Andrew J. Young,Bill Clinton,Kabir Sehgal

Download Walk in My Shoes: Conversations between a Civil Rights Legend and his Godson on the Journey Ahead ePub
  • ISBN 0230623603
  • ISBN13 978-0230623606
  • Language English
  • Author Andrew J. Young,Bill Clinton,Kabir Sehgal
  • Publisher St. Martin's Press; First Edition edition (May 11, 2010)
  • Pages 256
  • Formats azw mbr rtf lrf
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Social Sciences
  • Size ePub 1445 kb
  • Size Fb2 1365 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 970

A top aide to Martin Luther King, Jr., and one of history's most important civil rights leaders, Andrew Young has been a witness to history and made his own. During the civil rights movement, he worked tirelessly as a strategist and negotiator in the campaigns that resulted in the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act, and was at Dr. King's side when he was assassinated.

For years, he has been mentoring his godson, Kabir Sehgal, in correspondence and conversation. In this entertaining and provocative discourse, Young shares his thoughts and meditations on such important topics as civil rights, race, faith, love, and leadership. It's an inter-generational dialogue between Godfather and Godson, a living Tuesdays with Morrie. "This book is my attempt to humbly pass along a few anecdotes, life lessons, and insights to prepare you for the long journey ahead," Young says.

Andrew Young and Kabir Sehgal have produced a valuable book, one that offers timeless lessons of faith, love . Andrew Young is an American hero who has spent a lifetime leading by example

Andrew Young and Kabir Sehgal have produced a valuable book, one that offers timeless lessons of faith, love and leadership. The book illuminates the civil rights revolution of the 1960s and calls upon its readers-each in our own way -to carry on the work of building a more perfect America with courage and vision and humility. Senator Joe Lieberman. Andrew Young is an American hero who has spent a lifetime leading by example. Walk in My Shoes, poignantly illustrates Ambassador Young's wisdom and devotion to others. In this book, the life lessons of a great man makes us all better. Mellody Hobson, President, Ariel Investments.

Andrew Young and Kabir Sehgal have woven together years of their candid and unvarnished conversations .

Andrew Young and Kabir Sehgal have woven together years of their candid and unvarnished conversations to create a wonderful combination of biography, memoir, and guide to life. This is an enlightening book that shows how great wisdom is passed down to new generations. Walter Isaacson, president of The Aspen Institute. Together, Young and Sehgal create Walk in My Shoes, a record of the 20 year-long conversation between the two. For me, a 76 year-old African American female, observer and beneficiary of the struggles of Rev.

Walk in My Shoes - Andrew J. Young. Walk in My Shoes poignantly illustrates Ambassador Young’s wisdom and devotion to others

Walk in My Shoes - Andrew J. More praise for walk in my shoes. This is a great gift to America’s children-now and in the future. Walk in My Shoes poignantly illustrates Ambassador Young’s wisdom and devotion to others. In this book, the life lessons of a great man make us all better. Also by andrew young.

Walk in My Shoes book. Young offers his wisdom on these subjects to a new generation of young men and women in hopes that his battle-tested voice will inspire and encourage those in whose hands the world will soon rest.

In May 2010, Sehgal's Walk in My Shoes: Conversations between a Civil Rights Legend and his Godson on the Journey Ahead was published by Palgrave Macmillan. The book is co-written by former Mayor of Atlanta Andrew Young, his godfather, who offers his thoughts on leadership, civil rights, love and faith, among other topics. President Bill Clinton wrote the foreword. The album won the Grammy Award for the Best Latin Jazz Album and the 2015 Cubadisco for Best International Album In December 2014, Sehgal.

Young and Sehgal discuss their new book, Walk in My Shoes: Conversations between a Civil Rights Legend and his Godson on the Journey Ahead. Ted Turner is the host for event.

Eavesdrop (sort of) on a dialogue between former Martin Luther King Jr. advisor and lifetime civil-rights activist Andrew Young and his godson, Kabir Sehgal, as they converse about the history of race relations and the American dream. Posted: Thursday March 15 2012.

During the civil rights movement, he worked tirelessly as a strategist and negotiator during the campaigns that resulted in the passage of the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act, and was at Martin Luther King, J. s side when he was assassinated. For years, in correspondence and conversation, he has been mentoring his godson, Kabir Sehgal.

Andrew J. Young, Kabir Sehgal, President Bill Clinton. A top aide to Martin Luther King, J. Andrew Young has been a witness to history and has made his own.

His book Walk in My Shoes: Conversations Between a Civil Rights Legend and His Godson on the Journey Ahead (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), is a compilation of an inter-generational correspondence with Kabir Sehgal on topics such as race, faith, and leadership. Former Ambassador Young also responded to questions from members of the audience.

Talk about Walk in My Shoes: Conversations between a Civil Rights Legend and his Godson on the Journey Ahead


Bloodray
These conversations bring back many memories, some painful, others of peace and a sense of accomplishment. Andy Young is a man from my region of the South and my generation, who like myself, survived the Civil Rights generation and lived to tell about it. He has not only survived it, but has thrived and has lived a long, full, productive and even exemplary life, a life of many fine accomplishments, but one also filled with uncertainty, almost impossible challenges, fear and yes some failures. That he kept landing on his feet and on the right side of history was no mean trick, and had a lot to do with the sage advice he learned throughout his life and has passed on here to his co-author and godson, in this retrospective.

Here, most of his philosophy of life and his philosophy of success has been distilled down to its bare essence, into bite sized nuggets of wisdom, truths and some times mere truisms and questionable lore, all easily transmissible to the next generation. To wit: Follow your ideals not the money and fame; discover and listen to your inner voice; take baby steps towards your aspirations; the world doesn't change, it grows; favor the wisdom of life over the knowledge of facts; risking failure is part of the deal; and the most important one of all, you must start from where you are. These nuggets of wisdom (and many more) are given to his godson in the spirit of equals: that is to say in a "take it or leave it fashion." But Kabir makes it clear that he greatly admires and greatly values his godfather's advice. He realizes that it affords him a serious jump-start into a productive and meaningful life. We all wish we had had such an uncle.

I too grew up in the Civil rights era, learned the discipline of non-violence and participated actively in the change of that era. I had only one serious problem with Uncle Andy's advice.

As was true of all of us during that era, his unfortunately was the narrative of a "victim, forever overcoming his victimhood and victimization." Victory for him (as it once was for me) thus lay not in eradicating the evil of racism, (which should have been our real goal) but in achieving the status of "non-segregation." Need it be said that there is a huge difference between a state of "non-segregation" and a state of "racial equality and justice?" Did we in the Civil Rights era make a colossal, calculated and strategic blunder in settling for the much inferior goal of "non-segregation" rather than going for "full equality and justice?" Today, this very important distinction has been blurred: "non-segregation" has been equated with, and confused with full equality and justice in the contemporary American narrative.

What I have discovered in my old age (I will be 69 in August) is that the latter goal cannot be achieved by the Christian strategy of "failing to identify," or giving the "return address" of, or even pointing the finger at the evildoer, the enemy. But not to do so, while it may be morally self-righteous, is also to be cowardly complicent in the enemy's crimes.

I am not a Christian scholar (or even any longer a Christian) but I believe that this is a fatal flaw in the Christian's "turn the other cheek" philosophy of dealing with human power and social conflict. No matter what the Bible says, it doesn't work. To use Uncle Andy's language: It is BS. The evildoer (always a coward) simply gets a free pass, and is given the pass no less than by his own victim. Religious people tend to overlook this by giving "this dance of pre-emptive defeat" a cute well-rehearsed name such as "by the grace of God," "the power of forgiveness," etc. But history tells us that these are just accepted ecumenical niceties, religious word games that have nothing to do with the hard-nosed reality of racism. In fact no one can challenge the fact that it was the American Church that got into the game of "non-segregation (not even to mention "equality and justice") very late indeed (in fact, arguably only after seeing the handwriting on the wall?).

While it is true that some of us managed to escape through the ever narrowing and severely rationed loophole reserved in the gate just for us, the truth is that even today with a mulatto president, Dr. King's promissory note still gets stamped with the label "insufficient funds." Surely Uncle Andy did not fail to notice that today's "inner city schools" are still at least as segregated, and are now much, much worse than the segregated high school he attended in 1950s New Orleans?

Somehow no one will convince me that the enemy did not know that education was the only route to racial equality. Why else would it take 25 years before the first implementation of the 1954 Supreme Court Decision, and another 25 years to completely invalidate it? Today the schools in NY are as segregated as are those in Mississippi. Did the racists ever obey that 1954 edict? The available evidence of today says that they did not, but worked tirelessly against this law of the land, and did so from sea-to-shinning-sea. Nor indeed has Uncle Andy missed the fact that welfare coupled with neo-racism has virtually destroyed the Black family? Even with a mulatto president, a recent Brandis U. study claims that we are much worse off than we were before the Civil Rights era, and although Uncle Andy and I are doing okay, we somehow lucked out, the rest of our tribe is in a daily struggle trying to survive the socially-imposed economic and social melt-down. But worse, they have now reduced the value of equality, by increasing the circle of those who fit the N-word category. Yes there is more racial equality at the bottom of America's misery. But I doubt if that is what we had in mind in the 1960s. That outcome too in my view is a legacy of the strategic blunders of the Civil Rights era.

I may be wrong, but I believe that the avowedly religious approach of "turning the other cheek" has at least one identifiable strategic flaw: it allows the evildoer to escape unscathed. Under such a circumstance, the kind of cruelty that racism represents becomes cost-free. The evildoer can then simply regroup, recruit and multiply, refine his technique, and then bring forth an even more virulent, subtler but hardier strain of racism. I believe that in all of the hoopla about having a black president that is what we see today. What we have today is nothing more than a subtler more refined form of the racism perfected by the post-Civil war racists, still escaping under the radar and still under the banner of being ever-more tolerance and fair.

Kabir, please ask Uncle Andy about this, and email me his answer.

Five stars
Kata
"Walk In My Shoes" is a great book from many perspectives. First and foremost the story of Andrew Youngs role in the Civil Rights movement and public service is an important American story that deserves to documented and shared. I thank him for sharing his remarkable and important story.

The relationship between Kabir and his uncle Andy is endearing yet challenging for each of them. You sense they grow into their relationship while learning from each other's perspectives. This only comes from the experience of having lengthy conversations that develop over time. Andrew Young has a wonderful ability to see the big picture on various things in life and shares this wisdom of his experiences with him in a sometimes humorous and candid way. Kabir Seghal, his Godson, in turn asks probing questions to pull out more of the story from him but in a very respectful way. Andrew Young is a great story teller and Kabir Seghall does a beautiful job capturing these wonderful moments. I'm sure this book is only the tip of the iceberg of stories Andrew Young could tell. Maybe yet another book could be on the horizon? I hope so.
Pruster
A necessary read for all generations. Sehgal and Young connect their generations, and those of their readers, with thought-provoking concepts for continuing the work of the American Civil Rights Movement. Their contrasting life experiences bring the reader to an appreciation of the conversation, the need to see another's perspective, to listen. Further light is shed upon why the strategies and heart of the movement worked, and how these can be applied today. Walk in My Shoes reminds us all that violence is the worst form of poverty; when you are poor and panic, you may resort to irrational means. Movement from theory to action is a vital message one is left with.
Rleyistr
Bought and read this book a couple of months ago. It felt as if I was in a personal conversation with Kabir and his Godfather, as they opened the door to a blueprint of wisdom that is truly timeless. Wonderful and a needed read in this age.
Naril
Andrew Young, a 70 plus African American male, is a veteran of the civil rights movement, educated minister, politician , diplomat and son of the South. And he's much more. He was a close supporter and confidant of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and is a well read and experienced student of the world. Kabir Sehgal, who studied at the London School of Economics, is a jazz musician and writer. Sehgal is also well-read and traveled. Sehgal is Young's godson and mentee. Together, Young and Sehgal create Walk in My Shoes, a record of the 20 year-long conversation between the two.

For me, a 76 year-old African American female, observer and beneficiary of the struggles of Rev. King, Andrew Young and others in the civil rights movement, reading this book gave me an inside view of the motivations and thinking of Rev. King and of the forces at work throughout the struggle. Because Kabir Sehgal is an astute questioner, I could understand and appreciate Andy Young's contrarian views about politics and leadership. Also, Andy Young gives intriguing answers to Sehgal's questions about relationships: male to female, parent to child, and leaders to followers. The book is rich with insights into human motivations, ideas about solutions to current national problems and advice to young people seeking to change the world. Andy Young cautions the youth to have patience. He draws on the civil rights movement to illustrate the importance of taking time to plan and strategize before acting. The book is filled with examples that illustrate Young's truisms. To anyone from age 15 to 100, I recommend this book. It can be a guide to achieving one's goals. And it can help us all expand and enrich our perspective on making a positive contribution to the world.