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Download Inhuman Bondage : The Rise And Fall of Slavery in the New World ePub

by David Brion Davis

Download Inhuman Bondage : The Rise And Fall of Slavery in the New World ePub
  • ISBN 0739479776
  • ISBN13 978-0739479773
  • Author David Brion Davis
  • Publisher Oxford University Press, USA (2006)
  • Formats mbr mobi lrf doc
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Social Sciences
  • Size ePub 1829 kb
  • Size Fb2 1434 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 401

This book looks at slavery in the American South, describing black slaveholding planters, the rise of the Cotton Kingdom, the daily life of ordinary slaves, the highly destructive internal, long-distance slave trade, and much more.

Now, in Inhuman Bondage, Davis sums up a David Brion Davis has long been recognized as the leading authority on slavery in the Western World.

Now, in Inhuman Bondage, Davis sums up a David Brion Davis has long been recognized as the leading authority on slavery in the Western World. Now, in Inhuman Bondage, Davis sums up a lifetime of insight in what Stanley L. Engerman calls "a monumental and magisterial book, the essential work on New World slavery for several decades to come.

David Brion Davis has long been recognized as the leading authority on slavery in the Western World.

David Brion Davis has long been recognized as the leading authority on slavery in the Western World

David Brion Davis has long been recognized as the leading authority on slavery in the Western World.

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Inhuman Bondage" is an engaging, well-written, and fascinating history of slavery in the Western Hemisphere. I have an interest in the Civil War, and picked out this book to provide some background to understanding the roots of slavery in the United States

Inhuman Bondage" is an engaging, well-written, and fascinating history of slavery in the Western Hemisphere. I have an interest in the Civil War, and picked out this book to provide some background to understanding the roots of slavery in the United States

Davis David Brion (EN). David Brion Davis has long been recognized as the leading authority on slavery in the Western World.

Davis David Brion (EN). Engerman calls a monumental and magisterial book, the essential work on New World slavery for several decades to come.

Now, in Inhuman Bondage, Davis sums up a lifetime of insight in what Stanley L. Engerman calls "a monumental and . Davis begins with the dramatic Amistad case, which vividly highlights the international character of the Atlantic slave trade and the roles of the American judiciary, the presidency, the media, and of both black and white abolitionists. Now, inInhuman Bondage, Davis sums up a lifetime of insight in what Stanley L.

David Brion Davis has long been recognized as the leading authority on slavery in the Western World

David Brion Davis has long been recognized as the leading authority on slavery in the Western World.

widely as a full and comprehensive rendering of the subject and won the 2007 Ralph Waldo Emerson Award

SUMMARY Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World is a book by American cultural and intellectual historian David Brion Davis, published by Oxford University Press in 2006. It recounts the history of slavery in a global context. It was praised widely as a full and comprehensive rendering of the subject and won the 2007 Ralph Waldo Emerson Award. Davis, a leading authority on slavery in the western world, has said the impetus for the book began as a series of lectures for a course he taught on slavery at Yale in 1994.

Talk about Inhuman Bondage : The Rise And Fall of Slavery in the New World


Buriwield
My only regret is that I did not buy this in hard copy. The next time I read it, and I will read it again, it will be in hard copy so that I can make notes and take more time to analyze and study the information.

Do not be afraid of the academic founding of this book. It is thought provoking, enlightening, challenging, and the passion of the author is evident. I have traveled a great deal around the world and the issue of poverty, especially extreme poverty, and slavery straddles a fine line. When a person, child or adult, is desperate for food, shelter, and a future it is very easy for them to be taken advantage of and placed in bondage and potentially in slavery.

One of the key actions in this book is to define slavery and one definition stood out remarkably to me - "denial of a social identity". Removing a person's "social identity" denies that person human rights - such as the untouchables in India- denies them a voice in "democratic" countries - such as women who have no freedom without the presence of a male relative or the right to vote; denies them a place in society in order to obtain a job, build a home, have a family, and travel freely - as happened in the economically and politically motivated Apartheid of the United States and South Africa (that only came to a legal end in SA in 1994).

Denial of Social Identity is only one aspect of the many nuances of slavery. The author also separates slavery from racism. It is possible to be racist without the presence of slavery, but slavery, or the history of a race can have an enormous impact on how they are perceived in a specific society or cultural group.

The author explores these nuances and links the past with the present and on into the future. This is not just about slavery but how society can rationalize and justify its actions politically, economically, religiously, morally and ethically. It is how society can blind itself to it's own lack of humanity.

I would recommend this book to high school students. It should be read, discussed, argued about.... because slavery and bondage is still part of our world; in many different forms.
Bukus
A very scholarly book with many interesting citations which kept me constantly turning to the back of the book for more information. Progress was very slow, but the density of information did not disappoint. Many details of conversations, letters, lectures and other materials generated by the major players on both sides of the slavery issue provide much needed depth of understanding of the issues missing in many other books on the subject that just gloss over the issues with generalities. Personally, I would have preferred if many of the materials in the citations had been included in the main body of the book.
ℓo√ﻉ
"Inhuman Bondage" is an engaging, well-written, and fascinating history of slavery in the Western Hemisphere.

I have an interest in the Civil War, and picked out this book to provide some background to understanding the roots of slavery in the United States. I couldn't have picked out a better book!

Mr. Davis provides thorough coverage of every aspect of New World slavery, from its old world origins, to the history of abolitionism in England and America, to the end of American slavery with the Civil War. Davis has his own biases, but he doesn't hide them, and succeeds in presenting opposing viewpoints.

While slavery was clearly a central theme towards the end of the war, there is less agreement about how important it was as its cause (vs. 'maintaining the Union'). Davis provides a convincing argument that slavery was, in fact, central to the very genesis of this conflict, with a degree of inevitability going all the way back to the founding of this country.

For any armchair Civil War historian, this is an essential (and enjoyable!) read. It is fascinating, engaging, and highly educational. Highly recommended!
*Nameless*
The nineteenth century was one of momentous change, with life-improving technologies such as the railroad, the telegraph, the telephone, electricity, and anesthesia coming into widespread use. In addition to the technological changes, a colossally important moral improvement took place in the 1800s: the death of the institution of slavery in the Western world. David Brion Davis tells the important story of slavery's welcome demise in "Inhuman Bondage."

What makes this very well-researched volume so valuable is that it discusses slavery not just in the United States, but in Britain, the Caribbean, and Latin America as well, and how the changes in the institution in one region affected it in the others. The author even talks about how events like the English Civil War and the London fire of 1666 influenced slavery in the New World. Most people associate slavery with cotton plantations, but Davis relates how diverse slavery was and how in practice it differed from region to region.

Davis tracks the abolitionist movement from the first antislavery documents in Pennsylvania in 1688 through the mid-nineteenth century and discusses how religion, the Declaration of Independence, and the American Revolution affected attitudes toward slavery. He also tells the story of the slave revolts, and shows the methods American slaves used to attempt to maintain a core of dignity and self-respect in the face of their oppression.

The author discusses how slavery affected nineteenth century American politics up through the 1850s and the election of 1860, and shows how Lincoln dealt with the issue over the course of the Civil War.

One need not agree with all of the conclusions that Davis arrives at to appreciate this book that chronicles the ultimate abolition of slavery, one of the greatest moral developments of the modern age.