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Download Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative ePub

by Judith Butler

Download Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative ePub
  • ISBN 0415915880
  • ISBN13 978-0415915885
  • Language English
  • Author Judith Butler
  • Publisher Routledge (March 9, 1997)
  • Pages 200
  • Formats docx lrf mbr azw
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Social Sciences
  • Size ePub 1690 kb
  • Size Fb2 1299 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 974

With the same intellectual courage with which she addressed issues of gender, Judith Butler turns her attention to speech and conduct in contemporary political life, looking at several efforts to target speech as conduct that has become subject to political debate and regulation. Reviewing hate speech regulations, anti-pornography arguments, and recent controversies about gay self-declaration in the military, Judith Butler asks whether and how language acts in each of these cultural sites.

Judith Butler is Chancellor's Professor at the University of California, Berkeley. Thus, Butler points to the effect of the body and how bodies are implicated in acts of speech and iteration.

Judith Butler is Chancellor's Professor at the University of California, Berkeley. Her previous books include Gender Trouble (Routledge, 1990), and Bodies That Matter (Routledge, 1993). In this text Butler is perhaps at her most cogent and most optimistic reach. I would recommend picking this up for anyone serious about theories of performativity.

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The book argues that the conflation of speech and conduct can work tactically in favor of sexually conservative public policy . Butler, Judith, Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative.

The book argues that the conflation of speech and conduct can work tactically in favor of sexually conservative public policy, and that regulation of injurious speech offers ambivalent consequences for policies that seek to redress racial discrimination.

Judith Butler has brilliantly challenged us to rethink our conventional ideas about the" """ of speech. As is to be expected of Butler, Excitable Speech is original, witty, and lucidly argued. This book is essential reading for anyone concerned with the politics of free speech. ISBN 0-415-91587-2 (h.

With the same intellectual courage with which she addressed issues of gender, Judith Butler turns her attention to speech and conduct in contemporary political life, looking at several efforts to target speech as conduct that has become subject to political debate and regulation. Download (pdf, . 0 Mb) Donate Read

In her extraordinary new book, Excitable Speech, Judith Butle. ooks conceptually at speech, and she has plenty to sa. xcitable Speech offers a thoughtful consideration of the ways in which speech and speaking are used by all points on the political spectrum to further political.

In her extraordinary new book, Excitable Speech, Judith Butle. xcitable Speech offers a thoughtful consideration of the ways in which speech and speaking are used by all points on the political spectrum to further political ends. Makes a valuable contributio. o one should ignore Judith Butler's analysis and conclusions. Judith Butler is Chancellor's Professor at the University of California, Berkeley.

Para ler offline, realçar, adicionar marcadores ou tomar notas enquanto lê, transfira Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative.

Thus, Butler points to the effect of the body and how bodies are implicated in acts of speech and iteration.

This is a misunderstanding of both Butler and poststructural theories of agency in general.

Talk about Excitable Speech: A Politics of the Performative


Mr_TrOlOlO
Efficient
Malaunitly
While Ms. Butler is Professor of rhetoric at Berkeley University, and yes I confess I was expecting a work actually dealing with "speech", "politics", "the performative" (see Austin), I am confronted with Ms. Butler's views on homosexuals in the military, whether Derrida or Bourdieu was the better of the two (she knows - but does she know that, by the way, the two individuals did not exactly write on the same issues?), etc. etc. etc. ... So, while delighted to know this, for my own work, totally irrelevant.
Ceck
Just goes on and on about non sense. Perhaps I am just tired of theory. I felt like a lot of here thoughts were already expressed by Foucalt.
Camper
It arrived on time and in good shape. It arrived on time and in good shape. It arrived on time and in good shape.
Bundis
gift, didn't read
Asyasya
Butler is a difficult author to understand, particularly if you don't have a background in theories of performativity. I recommend reading JL Austin's How to Do Things with Words and Derrida's Limited, Inc either before or alongside this book. She also draws heavily from Foucault and Althusser.
Excitable Speech is powerful for its account of how subjects are formed through the address of hate speech and how, through this very address, the conditions for the subject's agency are enabled.
A previous reviewer pointed out that for Butler "the subject can only exhibit agency in and through language" and that agency in Butler's account emerges ex nihilio. This is a misunderstanding of both Butler and poststructural theories of agency in general. For Butler, agency is not produced by an autonomous actor; nor is it contained to language.
Drawing from Derrida and Bourdieu, Butler's point is that agency arises from social iterability and the fact that every re-iteration opens the potential for change and subversion. Such iteration, however, is part of the structure of signification broadly conceived (not simply language) and is not the conscious effort of an individual agent. Thus, Butler points to the effect of the body and how bodies are implicated in acts of speech and iteration.
In this text Butler is perhaps at her most cogent and most optimistic reach. I would recommend picking this up for anyone serious about theories of performativity.
Chi
The results of Butler's attempt to tackle the very serious issue of speech rights are disappointing in the extreme. With no legal background whatsoever and a myopic philosophical vision which seems ingorant of the liberal tradition upon which the right of free speech is grounded, Butler provides an obfuscted discussion (and that's all it is, a discussion) of the issue that is at the best of times, irrelevant, and at the worst of times, offensively misleading. The book is worthwhile only as an example of what happens when a postmodern thinker in the French tradition tries to tackle a subject outside the race/power/gender/subjectivity canon outlined by the philosophers of the 1960s. If you have an appetite for reading philosophical trainwrecks, then by all means read it. If you want something serious on the issue of free speech, look elsewhere.