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Download The Sexual Contract ePub

by PATEMAN

Download The Sexual Contract ePub
  • ISBN 0745604315
  • ISBN13 978-0745604312
  • Language English
  • Author PATEMAN
  • Publisher Polity Press; 1st Edition edition (June 23, 1988)
  • Pages 225
  • Formats rtf txt azw mobi
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Womens Studies
  • Size ePub 1899 kb
  • Size Fb2 1505 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 230

In this remarkably original work of political philosophy, one of today's foremost feminist theorist challenges the way contemporary society functions by questioning the standard interpretation of an idea that is deeply embedded in American and British political thought: that our rights and freedoms derive from the social contract explicated by Locke, Hobbes, and Rousseau and interpreted in the United States by the Founding Fathers.The author shows how we are told only half the story of the original contract that establishes modern patriarchy. The sexual contract is ignored and thus men's patriarchal right over women is also glossed over. No attention is paid to the problems that arise when women are excluded from the original contract but incorporated into the new contractual order.One of the main targets of the book is those who try to turn contractarian theory to progressive use, and a major thesis of the book is that this is not possible. Thus those feminists who have looked to a more "proper" contract- one between genuinely equal partners, or one entered into without any coercion- are misleading themselves. In the author's words, "In contract theory universal freedom is always a hypothesis, a story, a political fiction. Contract always generates political right in the forms of domination and subordination." Thus the book is also aimed at mainstream political theorists, and socialist and other critics of contract theory.The author offers a sweeping challenge to conventional understandings- of both left and right- of actual contracts in everyday life: the marriage contract, the employment contract, the prostitution contract, and the new surrogate mother contract. By bringing a feminist perspective to bear on the contradictions and paradoxes surrounding women and contract, and the relation between the sexes, she is able to shed new light on fundamental political problems of freedom and subordination.

The sexual contract is ignored and thus men's patriarchal right over women is also glossed over. Carole Pateman is Reader in Government at the University of Sydney, Australia, and the author of many books, including The Problems of Political Obligation.

The sexual contract is ignored and thus men's patriarchal right over women is also glossed over. One of the main targets of the book is those who try to turn contractarian theory to progressive use, and a major thesis of the book is that this is not possible.

The Sexual Contract book. Carole Pateman’s The Sexual Contract is perhaps her most acclaimed and recognized work in a very distinguished academic career. Published in 1988, the book analyses the classic political theory of social contract through the lens of feminism and democratic theory. More than twenty years after publication, Pateman’s opus remains a relevant critique of political theories that ignore the profound connections between feminism and democracy.

Carole Pateman is Reader in Government at the University of Sydney, Australia, and the author of many books, including The Problems of Political Obligation. Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0804714770. Publication Date: November 15, 2013.

Pateman’s recollections about how The Sexual Contract came into being underline the fallacy of any attempt to regard equal opportunity and formal equality as a solution for the intellectual advancement of women’s thought. How many more women with Pateman’s scholarly capabilities and intellectual capacity did not discover new possibilities because they did not bump into a woman at a party who went to Ruskin College?

As socio-legal scholars, The Sexual Contract has been formative in, and transformative of, our .

As socio-legal scholars, The Sexual Contract has been formative in, and transformative of, our understandings of law and gender. We explore Professor Pateman’s academic journey and consider how she came to write a ground-breaking book that has made major impacts on socio-legal and feminist legal studies.

1 Myriam Tardif, Sexual Contract Contract is based on Pateman’s doctoral thesis and this is well- reflected in the structure of her essay

1 Myriam Tardif, Sexual Contract Contract is based on Pateman’s doctoral thesis and this is well- reflected in the structure of her essay. Even though she provided social sciences with a very useful conceptual framework, Sexual Contract has to be understood in its own context and we should acknowledge the importance we know it had on feminists and theorists since she wrote it. However, her book contains multiples flaws that should be acknowledge when reading it from our actual point of view.

Other articles where The Sexual Contract is discussed: Carole Pateman: In her most famous work, The . Social-contract theorists like Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau rejected the notion that political authority could be obtained.

Other articles where The Sexual Contract is discussed: Carole Pateman: In her most famous work, The Sexual Contract (1988), Pateman challenged the liberal idea that the power of the state does not contradict the freedom of individuals because it is founded upon their consent.

item 3 The Sexual Contract, Paperback, by Carole Pateman -The Sexual . Country of Publication.

item 3 The Sexual Contract, Paperback, by Carole Pateman -The Sexual Contract, Paperback, by Carole Pateman. item 4 The Sexual Contract -The Sexual Contract.

The sexual contract which establishes modern patriarchy and the political right of men over women is never mentioned. In a wide-ranging and scholarly discussion, Pateman examines the significance of the political fictions of the original contract and the slave contract

The sexual contract which establishes modern patriarchy and the political right of men over women is never mentioned. In a wide-ranging and scholarly discussion, Pateman examines the significance of the political fictions of the original contract and the slave contract. She also offers a sweeping challenge to conventional understandings - of both left and right - of actual contracts in everyday life: the marriage contract, the employment contract, the prostitution contract and the new surrogacy contract.

Talk about The Sexual Contract


Lianeni
This author follows the logic of "pure contractarianism" to its theoretical conclusion: which is that the assumptions built into Rousseau's, Locke's and Hobbes' original "Social contract" is either a "reciprocal agreement about rights and obligations between equals;" or (turning it on its head) is "a political fiction about one group (males) right to dominate another (females)."

First exposing this flaw and then following its implications to their philosophical and logical endpoints, Ms. Pateman shows that trying to ignore the flaws and contradictions implicit in existing "social contracts" used as the primary vehicle to frame Western concepts of freedom and equality (i.e., the U.S. Constitution, etc.) by giving them an "after-the-fact" progressive twist, or worse by glossing over their deeper meanings and implications, is to render them meaningful only to members of the dominating group (men), and their socially adjusted willingly duped females.

According to her, if we take at face value what demonstrably is recognizable as modern patriarchy and allow its implied exploitative meanings of dominance to act as a "stand-in" for reality, that is, as "the extant social contract," we are engaging in a dangerous and unnecessary form of self-delusion, a form that denies the rights and genuine freedoms of more than half the human population.

She shows how when women "go along-to-get-along," allowing the poisonous implications of the flawed model of human freedom to get played out in everyday American society and social experience, we end up with the societal contradictions that we see everyday, in which marriage arrangements, sexist employment contracts, etc. amount to little more than the "contracts" that exist between pimps and their street whores.

The upshot of the book is that by exposing the flaws, delusions and self-contradictory sexist implications built into the flawed versions of the "social contract" (as her compatriot Dr. Charles Mill's did with respect to race, in his "The Racial Contract"), Ms. Pateman is able to reset the parameters for the fundamental theoretical vehicle that frames Western social and political experience.

This treatise is cleanly if not always clearly written and is without a doubt the work of a seasoned Philosopher going about her daily business. I should have read it first before having read Charles Mill's the "Racial Contract" for it is clear that much of his work leans heavily on her work. But since I only learned about it through Mill's book, I had no choice but to read them in the order I received them. 1000 stars
Quttaro
Although I don't subscribe to most feminist theories myself, I found Pateman's work to be incredibly well reasoned, and very interesting to read. One of her most intriguing arguments is that the marriage contract implicitly binds the woman to the man, creating a relationship between a master and his servant. I like that she is careful enough to add disclaimers to many of her arguments, explaining that no, not all men are like this, no, not all men desire to be masters in their marriages. She doesn't use these disclaimers as outs though - they only add to the strength and realism to her reasoning. She demonstrates that although we cannot generalize the natures of men, we can analyze and criticize the obligations that our society's contractual language creates for women.

She builds on the work of other philosophers, so it would be worth reading this book in conjunction with other essays on feminism and/or on contracts. She writes very clearly, and although you have to pace yourself as you move through the book, you probably won't find yourself too confused or lost at any point. It's quite easy to follow her train of thought.
Tisicai
An absolute classic. You cannot understand the political order without first understanding the sexual order. Pateman's book is both deep and broad. You won't be the same after reading it.
Kelenn
Ground breaking feminist theory.
Xinetan
A great work of political thought.
I ℓ٥ﻻ ﻉ√٥υ
I would have never purchased this book if it wasn't for my Women & Politics class.
I found it to be full of information that I was never taught in when in high school.
Haracetys
This book is one of those singular works which takes up a kind of genealogy of the intellectual foundations of modern gender relations. Her critiques of the major Enlightenment political philosophers covers a lot of ground and does it well.
Implicit is a critique not just of the conservative and liberal tradition, but of the patriarchy contained within the Left as well. As usual, feminism provides some of the most sophisticated critique of Left organizational practice, not just in relation to women, but as a whole.
Obviously, one reviewer was looking for something a bit more right-wing. But her work her follows alongside her defense of ideas like a minimum income, which are not intended to 'make people work' (in a society where 'work' equals 'exploitation' and alienation, the struggle against the imposition of work is the struggle against inhuman conditions.)
Especially in relation to women, however, her position makes sense, since 'housework' is work, and work for capital at that, which goes unwaged. The struggle for a social wage is the struggle for recognition and against the imposition of the endless work which is capital's goal for women.
Some people may not like this book because they think that we have now found the best of all worlds, but the continued gendering of inequality, oppression and labor indicates that maybe its time for more fundamental transformations.
This book was assigned as part of a college course on Gender and Race in American Political Thought. This was the first such book I'd read that didn't rely on political cliches to make it's point. Pateman offers a sensible and attainable solution and offers a look at gender relations that isn't steeped in anger, but maintains an urgency. It's a must-read for anyone who thinks they know the answers. My hat is off to Pateman.