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Download Life as We Do Not Know It: The NASA Search for (and Synthesis of) Alien Life ePub

by Peter Ward

Download Life as We Do Not Know It: The NASA Search for (and Synthesis of) Alien Life ePub
  • ISBN 0143038494
  • ISBN13 978-0143038498
  • Language English
  • Author Peter Ward
  • Publisher Penguin Books; Reprint edition (February 27, 2007)
  • Pages 320
  • Formats docx doc lit mobi
  • Category Technology
  • Subcategory Networking and Cloud Computing
  • Size ePub 1631 kb
  • Size Fb2 1157 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 979

An engrossing and revelatory first look at the search for alien life—on Earth and beyond

For the past twenty years, Peter Ward has been at the forefront of popular science writing, with books such as the influential and controversial Rare Earth. In Life as We Do Not Know It, Ward, with his signature blend of eloquence, humor, and learned insight, vividly details the latest scientific findings, cutting-edge research, and intrepid new theories on the subject of alien life and the possible extraterrestrial origins of life on Earth. In lucid, entertaining, and bold prose, Peter Ward once again challenges our notions of life on earth (and beyond).


I really enjoyed Ward and Brownlee's book "Rare Earth," published in 2003

I really enjoyed Ward and Brownlee's book "Rare Earth," published in 2003. If Ward's description in his more recent book, "Life as We Do Not Know It" of his cool if not down right rude reception by a SETI administrator at a dinner party cum science meeting is true, one can certainly see why those with a nay-say keep a low profile. That's too bad, too, because far more can be achieved with a more modest means by facing reality than by grand illusions.

Peter Ward and his colleague Don Brownlee addressed the third deep question, "Does life tend to. .I found this part of the book intriguing and optimistic

Peter Ward and his colleague Don Brownlee addressed the third deep question, "Does life tend to evolve into intelligent life?" in their controversial book Rare Earth and came to the unpopular conclusion that intelligent life is very rare, and that overwhelmingly the vast preponderance of life Controversial and worthwhile but somewhat quixotic. I found this part of the book intriguing and optimistic. Ward urges us to send manned missions to both Mars and Titan because he believes that only space boots on the ground and instruments in gloved hands can best find the aliens he believes live there.

Authoritative and eye opening, Life as We Do Not Know It is sure to provoke wonder and heated debate among .

A principal investigator for the NASA Astrobiology Institute, which funds a program to study life as we do not know it -investigating the possibility of life on other planets or, more controversial, creating non-DNA life in the laboratory-Peter Ward presents the latest data on the range of life that are scientifically possible on Earth and beyond.

Synthesizing RNA life. The creation of new life. ALH 84001 and the revival of panspermia. Peter Ward, a recognized authority on mass extinctions, is professor of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. His books include Gorgon, Future Evolution, The End of Evolution, and, with Donald Brownlee, Rare Earth and The Life and Death of Planet Earth. He has also appeared in numerous TV documentaries for PBS, Discover, and The Learning Channel. Библиографические данные.

In addition to audacious and imaginative hypotheses of what new forms of life we might encounter in the universe, Ward proposes a radical new theory on a reclassification of life that.

Call us (08:30-17:00 UK.

Call us (08:30-17:00 UK). 013. A principal investigator for the NASA Astrobiology Institute, which funds a program to study "life as we do not know it"-investigating the possibility of life on other planets or, more controversial, creating non-DNA life in the laboratory-Peter Ward presents the latest data on the range of life that are scientifically possible on Earth and beyond.

Talk about Life as We Do Not Know It: The NASA Search for (and Synthesis of) Alien Life


Jake
I found this book very interesting, thinking about what other kinds of life might exist, like with a different set of DNA bases, or even life based on RNA. And for me, Peter Ward is very readable, very engaging.
Taulkree
This book offers a detailed look at the possibility of life elsewhere in the Solar System. Ward starts off examining how life got started on Earth, in order to understand how it could get started elsewhere. He comes across as very knowledgable on the subject and gives a very interesting survey of the various theories and their problems. His discussion of how life can hitchhike on meteors is very convincing, as he demolishes the objections one by one. He discusses all the possible types of 'alien life', including some I had never encountered before. He then looks at Mars, Europa, Titan and the upper atmosphere of Venus as the most likely abodes of life.

Overall, this is a very good book. Peter Ward packs a lot of information into a moderately sized book and does so in a very readable fashion. I found this book hard to put down. He also scores some definite hits: his speculation that viruses not only qualify as life (a somewhat controversial point) but also are representatives of the earliest type of life, with cellular life coming later, (a very controversial point) has been bolstered by recent research, including the discovery of a super virus with more genes than the simplest bacteria. His suggestion that the Moon is a source of pristine fossiles from early Earth, Mars and Venus via meteor transfer (an incredible 2% of the rocks on the Moon are believed to have originated elsewhere) provides a real justification for returning there.

On the other hand, Ward has a tendency to make claims he can't, or doesn't, prove. His off-hand claim to have solved the cause of the Permian/Triassic extinction (by far the worst on record) would be disputed by most scientists in the field, who consider the question still open. His dismissal of the possibility of life in the atmosphere of Jovian planets would be more convincing if he explained why the lack of iron was a show-stopper. He also claims that ammonia has been found in the Martian atmosphere, something categorically denied by the ESA; a demonstration of why you don't treat unsubstantiated rumor as fact.

Perhaps the most annoying part to me is the bibliography. Ward does not footnote every assertion, not unreasonable in a popular book, but for many of the more interesting or controversial points, there is no reference in the bibliography. This leaves the reader stuck with either accepting Ward's statements as gospel or having to do a lot of research to doublecheck them.

So, not a perfect book, but still a very strong one. I would recommend it to anyone interested in the topic.
Anarius
"Life as We Do Not Know It" is a truly entertaining book, and it's definitely thorough in it's perspective and presentation.

I really enjoyed Ward and Brownlee's book "Rare Earth," published in 2003. I felt it brought a little sober balance into the whole search for extraterrestrial life thing. So often with a truly enchanting perspective, like that of the SETI people, everyone gets so charmed by the popular concept that few are willing to raise a dissenting voice even if it is realistic. After all, who wouldn't like to find ET out there? And with as disarming a spokesperson as the late Carl Sagan to push for it, who would be so bold as to point out difficulties. If Ward's description in his more recent book, "Life as We Do Not Know It" of his cool if not down right rude reception by a SETI administrator at a dinner party cum science meeting is true, one can certainly see why those with a nay-say keep a low profile. That's too bad, too, because far more can be achieved with a more modest means by facing reality than by grand illusions.

Admittedly the public's--or their political representatives'--unwillingness to part with funds for scientific projects unless they generate popular enthusiasm is much to blame for this single sided point of view. Suddenly science, especially space science, ends up a sort of traveling road show, with NASA in competition with other purveyors of big budget science for funds.

I can't decide if Ward has joined "The Dark Side" with his new book or is genuinely this enthusiastic about discovering life on other planets. Certainly his presently taking part in NASA's study of life on planet earth and of the implications for its occurrence elsewhere might tend to bias his point of view a little. This noted, however, Ward's new work certainly gives a thorough discussion of what we know of the origins of life on our own planet, particularly that of our extremeophiles. He discusses the many possibilities with respect to how life arose, when it did, and under what types of conditions it survived and thrived.

More recent studies of deep earth organisms and of thermophiles living around the mid-ocean ridges that circumscribe the globe like big zippers, has lead to a more optimistic view of the toughness of life. Those first little critters who set our bio-world going were tenacious if nothing else. From these "ancestors" of earth life as we know it today, the author projects the likelihood that similar--or very alien--life might have arisen in the past on other planets given similar conditions. He uses the planets Mars and Venus and the moons Europa, Titan and Triton as his most likely venues for past life, and gives odds on whether life might exist still on Europa or Titan. He also presents the possibility of life on Venus--much as Sagan did for Jupitor and Saturn in his book Cosmos in the 1970s--floating in the gaseous clouds. He also discusses the long discredited notion of Panspermia, now once again a popular idea, which suggests that life, or at least its constitutents, may be ubiquitous in the cosmos. At least within given solar systems it might simply hop from planet to planet seeding all of them. Under the proper conditions, the theory suggests that life emerges and evolves to suit the environment of the seeded planet. Who knows? Certainly we never will unless we make an effort to search our neighboring planets.

An interesting book, and very worth while reading.
Manemanu
Really fascinating book by an excellent author. This book roped me into reading some of his others. Really fascinating material for anyone interested in the subject.
Light out of Fildon
The concept of extinction did not exist until the nineteenth century. Until then there was no sense that species evolved, lived for a time, and then went extinct. Because religion still held sway over so much of the world, there was a sense that everything God had ever created would still be found - somewhere.

- Peter Ward "Life as We Do Not Know It"

"Thirdly, That there may have been divers Species of things wholly destroyed and annihilated, and divers others changed and varied, for since we find that there are some kinds of Animals and Vegetables peculiar to certain places, and not to be found elsewhere; if such a place have been swallowed up, 'tis not improbable that those Animal Beings may have been destroyed with them; and this may be true both of aerial and aquatick Animals:..."

- Robert Hooke, Discourse on Earthquakes, 1667
Vivados
Would be higher but weeks late either leave in mailbox if it fits or leave by door still good book
Faebei
good price/ good quality/ reasonable lead time