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Download C++ for Dummies (For Dummies Computer Book Series) ePub

by Stephen R. Davis

Download C++ for Dummies (For Dummies Computer Book Series) ePub
  • ISBN 1568841639
  • ISBN13 978-1568841632
  • Language English
  • Author Stephen R. Davis
  • Publisher Hungry Minds Inc (August 1994)
  • Pages 409
  • Formats rtf lrf docx azw
  • Category Technology
  • Subcategory Programming
  • Size ePub 1925 kb
  • Size Fb2 1510 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 971

A beginner's bible to the popular programming language includes everything anyone ever needed to know to master C++++ in an easy-to-follow format--even for those sitting in corners wearing dunce caps. Original. (Beginner).

He has been programming for more than 30 years and presently works for L-3 Communications in the area of Homeland Defense. I have programmed in Basic, Pascal, and Visual Basic. I read the Sam's Teach Yourself Java in 21 days and when I had finished I found there was still things I was confused about, so I got Java for Dummies. While that cleared up things a bit more. I figured I would go back to the Visual environment.

Series: C++ FOR DUMMIES. Paperback: 432 pages it's not that this book is bad but i would not say it's for dummies per say it doesn't require math to learn programming but every other example they. Paperback: 432 pages. I love these books, they are structured well and explain things clearly; the name brand is a clever misnomer. it's not that this book is bad but i would not say it's for dummies per say it doesn't require math to learn programming but every other example they use has something to do with math jumping into C++ is a much better paced book that i will admit is a lot thicker so it seems more intimidating but trust.

Let expert Stephen Randy Davis be your guide as you explore C syntax, discover object-oriented programming techniques, and start developing Windows applications. This is not a book for dummies. See the About the CD appendix for details and complete system requirements. I bought this book before taking a C ++ class because usually textbooks are very hard to understand. However this book is very hard to understand.

This book explores the basic development concepts and techniques of C++ and explains the "how" and "why" of C++ .

This book explores the basic development concepts and techniques of C++ and explains the "how" and "why" of C++ programming from the ground up. You'll discover what goes into creating a program, as well as how to put the various pieces together, deal with standard programming challenges, handle debugging, and make it all work. Note: CD-ROM/DVD and other supplementary materials are not included as part of eBook file. Скачать (pdf, . 7 Mb) Читать.

435 Pages · 2004 · . 1 MB · 1,104 Downloads ·English. Doug Lowe has written a whole bunch of computer books, including more than 35 For Dummies books Networking for. by Davis, Stephen R. Software. Statistics: 1001 Practice Problems For Dummies. 75 MB·17,967 Downloads. 2 1,001 Statistics Practice Problems For Dummies. Part 1: The Questions. The questions Statistics: 1,001 Practic.

C++ For Dummies book. The -for Dummies series of books are great in teaching the basics of a programming. Davis' book is no exception, despite being Stephen R. Davis, C++ for Dummies (IDG, 1994). One of the main problems (from my perspective) with the vast majority of C++ books on the market is that they're written for C programmers who want to migrate. The author however, could be alitte more specific on the more advance things and be more details.

In fact, by the end of Chapter 1, you’ll be able to create a C++ program. Written by Stephen Randy Davis, author of C++ Weekend Crash Course, C++ for Dummies, takes you through the programming process step-by-step. You’ll discover how to: Generate an executable.

History For Dummies (For Dummies by Greg Velm.

The best-selling C++ For Dummies book makes C++ easier! .

The book provides step-by-step instruction from the ground up, helping beginners become programmers and allowing intermediate programmers to sharpen their skills. Okay, I know what you’re going to say: I’ve seen computers that could understand English. The book provides step-by-step instruction from the ground up, helping beginners become programmers and allowing intermediate programmers to sharpen their skills.

Talk about C++ for Dummies (For Dummies Computer Book Series)


Andriodtargeted
Very well-done and clear tutorial to C++. I bought this to learn the basics, having done no programming before, and after four months I've made almost a hundred programs, including a chess game and a program to model the quantum physics double-slit experiment. You'l need supplemental resources once you get into functions and classes and things, but for the basics, it was the best book I could find.
Idk if I can write this, but I recommend "Learn c++ by making games" as a supplement, as reading the corresponding sections in both books really helped me learn.
sobolica
I love these books, they are structured well and explain things clearly; the name brand is a clever misnomer. C++ For Dummies was actually purchased as a study guide during my final semester, it makes sense out of programming functions that are otherwise confusing to learn when you are a beginner. I recommend this book to EVERYONE, computers are the future; join the crowd and make something awesome!
Rollers from Abdun
I'm certainly not a computer genius, but I'm not a novice, either. I've written some nice programs in MS-DOS (remember that) which kept track of sports standings as you input game scores, and once helped a full-fledged programmer create a payroll program. This book may be okay for some, but it certainly isn't organized, so I'm looking for another. Commands used from Chapter One such as "input" and "include" aren't explained until a quarter of the way through the book. His explanations of code line within the programs are more confusing than writing the program and then explaining the new commands in preceding and/or seceding paragraphs.
Defolosk
As a beginner programmer, I found this quite hard to follow which made me feel dumber than a dummie. The author seems to find that if he puts in a lot of puns and play on words that it will make learning C++ easier, he is wrong. With all the jargon existing in a big language like C++ simpler is better, but in this book the guy never stops mixing up phrases just to be funny which just confused the hell out of me even more. Eventually I had to drop this book and pick up another C++ one for clarity sake by Michael Dawson, Beginning C++ through game programming 2nd ed. This one is far easier to read. The Dummies book doesnt have any exercises either so sometimes its in one ear and out the other. My assumption is that this book is for the seasoned programmer looking to learn C++ rather than a person new to programming.

Having said that, I picked up a lot more the second time around once I had read Mr Dawson's book first so in this respect it was quite a good follow-on book that explained things a little differently and provided a bigger picture to C++. Ultimately I wouldnt recommend it to anybody wanting to learn C++, there are far better books out there that explain a complicated subject with finesse and ease and this isnt one of them.
Brannylv
Like just about every C++ book I've yet read, this one starts out great but then painfully deteriorates into yet another tiresome trudge through overwhelming, unexplained proceduralism that would have you drink from a fire hose. Your unending quest for a truly good C++ book must therefore continue, I'm afraid.
Brazil
it's not that this book is bad but i would not say it's for dummies per say it doesn't require math to learn programming but every other example they use has something to do with math jumping into C++ is a much better paced book that i will admit is a lot thicker so it seems more intimidating but trust me you will actually learn something from it
Gaeuney
I've been looking for just the right introduction to programming for some time. I've spent more than a dozen hours combing through the shelves in my local Borders and B&N, skimming over 50 so-called "introductory" texts, looking for one that I could really learn from. By way of background, I am an advanced computer user/tinkerer, but I'm completely inexperienced in the field of programming -- never so much as typed a lick of code.
In reviewing other books, I didn't want to start with a book about C, because conventional wisdom says that it's a bad idea to start with C (a procedural language) if you plan to use it to jumpstart a study of C++ or java (hybrid OOP languages). I also didn't want to start with a book on QBasic, because it seems to me that the language is pretty much obsolete. For me, I wanted to learn OOP, and that meant a commitment to C++ and/or java (preferably both, as each has its strengths and weaknesses, and they are similar and popular enough to study together).
That said, I looked at somewhat advanced introductory books by Deitel, Savitch, and Horton, all of which are extremely well-reviewed here on Amazon. I also looked at several books from Microsoft Press, as I planned on learning by using components of the Visual Studio. Horton's Beginning C++ came close, but its massive size and more advanced approach left me looking for a different introductory text (I plan on returning to Horton's book though, to supplement what I learn from Mr. Davis' book).
Finally, this new edition of C++ for Dummies came out just in time. This book really hits the mark on many levels: (1) it assumes no knowledge of programming; (2) it does a great job of explaining truly complex topics without going overboard or hitting you over the head; (3) it is clear and entertaining; and (4) it is new and compliant with the latest standards, which is more than I can say for books written, say, pre-1998.
Do yourself a favor -- if you have no programming experience and want to learn a cutting edge OOP language like C++ or java, start here, then use that knowledge to branch out to more advanced material. Personally, I'm supplementing this reading with Horton's Beginning C++ and Beginning Java 2 (JDK 1.3 Version), and Bruce Eckel's highly praised Thinking in Java.
Good luck!