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Download The Blue Sword ePub

by Robin McKinley

Download The Blue Sword ePub
  • ISBN 0613336763
  • ISBN13 978-0613336765
  • Language English
  • Author Robin McKinley
  • Publisher Turtleback Books: A Division of Sanval (October 2000)
  • Formats rtf azw lit lrf
  • Category Teenagers
  • Subcategory Literature and Fiction
  • Size ePub 1115 kb
  • Size Fb2 1626 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 358


Part of Damar series by Robin McKinley.

Part of Damar series by Robin McKinley. The daughter learned to love books, particularly adventure novels where the hero rode a beautiful horse and ran all the villains through with his silver sword, but her embroidery was never above passable; and she only learned to dance after her mother pointed out that such grace and balance as she might learn on the dance floor would doubtless stand her in good.

THE BLUE SWORD Robin McKinley To Danny and Peachey, who first led me to Damar. CHAPTER ONE She scowled at her glass of orange juice

THE BLUE SWORD Robin McKinley To Danny and Peachey, who first led me to Damar. CHAPTER ONE She scowled at her glass of orange juice. To think that she had been delighted when she first arrived here-was it only three months ago?-with the prospect of fresh orange juice every day. But she had been eager to be delighted; this was to be her home, and she wanted badly to like it, to be grateful for it-to behave well, to make.

Although The Blue Sword is the first book in the Damar series, I read it after reading the second book (The Hero and the Crown) and I don't think it even really matters which one someone happens to read first because they are set several hundred years apart. Whichever you happen to read first, you're bound to enjoy these hints at the other one.

To Danny and Peachey, who first led me to Damar.

Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Although The Blue Sword is the first book in the Damar series, I read it after reading the second book (The Hero and the Crown) and I don't think it even really matters which one someone happens to read first because they are set several hundred years apart.

I also think this 1982 book has been a little bit forgotten over the years, at least if you're not a Robin McKinley fan, and that it beats most of what passes for YA fantasy nowadays. It's certainly (IMO) much better than most of McKinley's more recent works, so if you've tried one of her later books and think she's not for you, you need to give this one a try. (Or The Hero and the Crown. I recommend both without reservation.

The Blue Sword is a fantasy novel written by American author Robin McKinley. It follows Angharad "Harry" Crewe, a recently orphaned young woman, to a remote military outpost in colonized Damar where her brother is stationed. When she meets Corlath, the mystical king of the Damarian Hillfolk, Harry discovers her own magical powers and a destiny that leads her to save Damar from invasion.

Robin McKinley's other books include the Newbery Award-winning The Hero and the Crown; Newbery Honor Book The Blue Sword; Sunshine; Spindle's End; Rose Daughter; Deerskin; The Outlaws of Sherwood.

Robin McKinley's other books include the Newbery Award-winning The Hero and the Crown; Newbery Honor Book The Blue Sword; Sunshine; Spindle's End; Rose Daughter; Deerskin; The Outlaws of Sherwood; and the short story collections The Door in the Hedge; A Knot in the Grain and Other Stories; and, with her husband, the author Peter Dickinson, Water: Tales of Elemental Spirits.

Talk about The Blue Sword


Mr.Twister
I'm an English major and I actually read this in college for a YA lit class. I thoroughly enjoyed it and forgot all about it for years, until something triggered the memory and I searched and searched till I found it since I could not remember the name. I love Tolkien and I love Harry Potter and the Chronicles of Narnia if that helps you decide whether you'd like it. What I love about this book and the sort of prequel The Hero and the Crown:
1) Well-drawn characters. I'm interested in all of them, even minor ones. Relatable, flawed, all that good stuff.
2) unique plot and setting. I love Damar and if you read the books I think you'll understand why.
3) the fantasy elements are neat without going crazy.
4) McKinley is a good writer. A very good writer. I don't get tired of her style. The way she phrases things is interesting and all the facets of the story, including but not limited to the plot line, come together well.
5) Both The Blue Sword and The Hero and the Crown won Newberry awards. Yet to me they don't read like childish books. They deal with great themes in accessible ways.
6) some of my very favorite female protagonists are in these two books, but there are strong male characters as well. None of the characters are perfect. I guess this reiterates #1. :)

I have read both of these books probably 3 times each and I will probably read them 20 more times, as often as the details start to get fuzzy so I can enjoy the freshness of the story all over again.
Wrathmaster
The Blue Sword was one of my favorite books as a child- a strong female lead, horses, swords, magic... i read it probably a dozen times. When I saw it was available finally on Kindle, I eagerly bought it, but there was always that back corner of my mind that warned it might not be as exciting to me, now, as an adult. I needn't have worried! The prose is exquisite- which alone is enough to recommend it. Robin McKinley weaves a tale that seems simple on the surface but is steeped in complexity. This book deals with themes of moving and homesickness and coming to terms with loss. It deals with complex relationships between siblings, as well as the development of strong mentor-student relationships. It also deals with com
Era
I enjoyed the "Hero and the Crown" and this story takes place years afterwards with Coraith the current King of the Free Hillfolk descended from Queen Aerin and King Tor who's exploits have become legends. His people have declined in number and now a new threat from the north comes to overthrow his people and take their lands. Harry Crewe is sent to live with a couple who agree to look after her after her father dies, leaving her an orphan. She is an independent tomboy who dreams of adventures and isn't a typical woman in this time and place. Coraith comes to her town to seek allies in his fight with the North, but leaves empty handed except for kidnapping Harry and taking her with him. He feels compelled to take her because somehow she will give his people hope to defeat the North. The only thing that puzzles me is when Harry awakes and finds she's been kidnapped, she doesn't even ask questions as to why she was taken and what is going to happen to her. She goes along with whatever her captors want her to do without question . She doesn't strike me as particularly passive woman so I was surprised in her accepting behavior of her situation and would like to have seen her stand up for herself and at least show some interest in what would happen to her. This is certainly a fairy tale story where with 6 weeks of training, she can go to war and fight with an enchanted sword. The romance between Harry and Coriath seemed hurried in the end , but then this is a fairy tale. This is still an interesting book with an otherwise strong female lead character that I enjoyed reading even though I think it was overpriced for a Kindle book.
Gold as Heart
DISCLAIMER: The following review was originally posted on my book blog The Book Challengers (link in bio).

And I fell head over heels in love with Robin McKinley's writing all over again. The characters, the setting, the dialogue ... it's all so well written in a way that one can't help but fall head first into this world of Damar, of riding horses, magic called kelar, destinies, desert people ... Ah, it's kind of perfect.

It's not a very long book, but somehow I have this clear image in my head of this world, of the characters and how everything happened. One doesn't always have to write several pages about one event when one has the skill Robin McKinley has. Her writing style is somewhat unique as I don't think I have ever come across other readers with similar writing styles. I shouldn't like it because there's quite a lot of telling and I usually prefer more showing than telling, but it somehow works with McKinley's books. It just works.

I really liked Harry because she's no damsel in distress even though she kind of is. She's ready to stand up for herself and she's one hell of a Rider. At first she doesn't belong anywhere, but luckily for her it changes because she finds just the place for her and I loved the fact that it wasn't inherently tied to her newfound love interest. Even if the love interest hadn't reciprocated her feelings, she still found her place where she belongs.

Although The Blue Sword is the first book in the Damar series, I read it after reading the second book (The Hero and the Crown) and I don't think it even really matters which one someone happens to read first because they are set several hundred years apart. Whichever you happen to read first, you're bound to enjoy these hints at the other one.

I want more of McKinley!
Xava
I read The Blue Sword for the first time in 1977. I loved it the, and I still love it now, after 20 or so readings. The film technology is now sophisticated enough to render a true-to-story movie. It's a fantastic read -- very easy to get into and finish satisfied. The book is appropriate for children aged 9 or 10 and older.