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by Gordon Crabb,Leon Garfield

Download Devil-in-the-Fog ePub
  • ISBN 0440400953
  • ISBN13 978-0440400950
  • Language English
  • Author Gordon Crabb,Leon Garfield
  • Publisher Yearling; 1st edition (September 1, 1988)
  • Pages 183
  • Formats mobi txt doc rtf
  • Category Teenagers
  • Subcategory Literature and Fiction
  • Size ePub 1546 kb
  • Size Fb2 1601 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 167

Fourteen-year-old George's family of traveling actors inform him that he is actually the son of a dying, wealthy man and send him to stay with his real family, a group of mean, sickly, even murderous people.

Dramatised by Martin Jameson Two-part dramatisation of Leon Garfield's thrilling 18th century mystery adventure. Episode 1 of 2. 14 year-old George is the oldest of the seven Treet children.

Dramatised by Martin Jameson Two-part dramatisation of Leon Garfield's thrilling 18th century mystery adventure. Captained by their larger-than-life father, the Treets are touring thespians, forever on the edge of poverty. But their normally happy lives are shadowed by the twice yearly arrival of "the Stranger" who hands Mr Treet a sum of money and disappears. This year, however, the Stranger appears for the last time and Mr Treet reveals to George that he is the son of a nobleman, Sir John Dexter

All books are picked, packed and dispatched from the United Kingdom.

All books are picked, packed and dispatched from the United Kingdom.

His second book, Devil-in-the-Fog (1966), won the first annual Guardian Prize and was serialised for television, as. .

His second book, Devil-in-the-Fog (1966), won the first annual Guardian Prize and was serialised for television, as were several later works (below). Many of Garfield's books have been adapted for film or television: Devil-in-the-Fog was televised in 1968; Smith in 1970; The Strange Affair of Adelaide Harris was made into a 6-part BBC serial in 1979; Black Jack was made into a feature film by Ken Loach in the same year; John Diamond was made into a.

Devil in the Fog book. Leon Garfield was one of the most celebrated children's authors of the twentieth century, and won the Guardian Award, The Whitbread Award, and the Carnegie medal

Devil in the Fog book. Leon Garfield was one of the most celebrated children's authors of the twentieth century, and won the Guardian Award, The Whitbread Award, and the Carnegie medal. This is a fast-moving, exciting read and is accompanied by atmospheric black and white line drawings by acclaimed artist Jason Cockcroft.

Author Leon Garfield was born in Brighton, England on July 14, 1921. When World War II began, he stopped studying art and joined the British Army Medical Corps

Author Leon Garfield was born in Brighton, England on July 14, 1921. When World War II began, he stopped studying art and joined the British Army Medical Corps. While posted in Belgium, he met Vivien Alcock, who would later become his wife as well as a popular children's author. After the war, he worked as a biochemical laboratory technician until the 1960's when he became a full-time writer. He wrote more than thirty books for both children and adults and scripted Shakespeare: The Animated Tales for television.

Product Information:TITLE: Devil-in-the-Fog (Puffin Books). Publisher : Puffin Books. Item Information:Author : Garfield, Leon. Other Details:Condition : Acceptable. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 14 pre-owned listings.

Book's title: Devil-in-the-fog. Garfield, Leon 1921-1996 Verfasser (DE-588)119160773. Varying Form of Title: Devil in the fog. System Control Number: (OCoLC)918392930. System Control Number: (DE-599)BVBBV040490765. Personal Name: Garfield, Leon 1921-1996 Verfasser (DE-588)119160773. Publication, Distribution, et. London. Longman Young Books (c)1973.

Devil-in-the-fog by Léon Garfield - book cover, description, publication history. A dramatic and eerie story of lost identity and family secrets, told in Leon Garfield's memorable and distinctive style. George Treet is happy with his life as part of a family of travelling actors. But George's world turns upside down when he discovers that Mr Treet is not his real father, and that he must go and live with his real family Leon Garfield was one of the most celebrated children's authors of the twentieth century, and won the Guardian Award, The Whitbread Award, and the Carnegie medal Genre: Children&apo.

Talk about Devil-in-the-Fog


Sharpbrew
Another exciting and exquisitely crafted tale from this writer. Along with his other works, a must read for older children.
Gadar
Garfield has a great talent for writing a good, entertaining mystery in a style reminiscent of Dickens.
And he does that without the nausea of a driving political agenda so common in many contemporary stories.
Recommended reading for young adults through old.
WinDImmortaL
14-year-old George Treet worships his father, Thomas, as a genius—“a grand man, as great in mind as he is in body...[a] grand spirit...[and] powerful face...the bright look of invention in his eyes, and the mind that’s produced the most remarkable stage effects our age has known...” The Treets—six of them besides George and their father, three boys and three girls—comprise a family of travelling actors in 18th-century England; never very successful, and often financially embarassed, sometimes to the point of Mr. Treet’s being put in the stocks. But life on the road is good, and all that really interrupts the smooth tenor of George’s life is the twice-yearly appearance (on June 3 and November 3, and always after dark) of the mysterious man the family knows only as “the Stranger.” None of the Treets doubts that their father’s predictions of “the roar and acclaim when we’re on the London stage” are true pictures of the future. Only once has George ventured to ask who the Stranger is and why he comes, always with a bag of money for Mr. Treet—30 guineas, no more and no less. Then, one November night at the Eloquent Gentlewoman Inn in Kent, he appears once more—and declares that his “Principal instructs me—come no more.” At this, Mr. Treet feels himself free to answer George’s question. George, it seems, is not his son at all, but the son of one Sir John Dexter of Sussex. As an infant, he was given to Mr. Treet to bring up, in consideration of 60 guineas a year. With the payments ended, Mr. Treet’s conscience insists that George must be returned to his true family.

George discovers that Sir John was recently wounded in a duel with his younger brother, a career Army officer, and may not have long to live. His wife, Lady Dexter, proves to be cold and unfriendly—not at all what George would have expected of a mother bereft of her only son for 13 years. Then there’s the gloomy Dr. Newby, the secretive manservant Joseph, and the local medium, Mrs. Montague, who insists she’s been talking to the real George Dexter (deceased) for years. George also learns that the estate is entailed—it can be inherited only by a son of the direct Dexter line—and that his presumptive uncle, Captain Richard Dexter, is next in line for it and the father of three robust sons to inherit after him. Is it possible that Captain Dexter was the Stranger’s mysterious Principal, who spirited infant George out of his cradle in the hope of gaining his brother’s wealth and estate, but couldn’t bring himself to murder a baby?

Meanwhile, Captain Dexter has been sent to Newgate Prison for the assault upon his brother, escaped, and is now hiding in a thick copse not far from the manor house. George must discover the truth—from whom is he in danger, and why?—while attempting to aid the improvident Treets (whom he still, naturally, loves dearly) and win over his mother. Garfield’s mastery of atmosphere is impressive, as the tension and suspense slowly ratchet tighter and tighter, and young readers will be interested to note that even among the upper crust of England in those days, grammar was nowhere near as perfect as theirs is expected to be—“was” for “were,” “don’t” for “doesn’t,” and “ain’t” in quantities! The tale ends with a double twist that will delight and astonish them. This is perhaps Garfield’s best-ever story of historical suspense.
Dorintrius
I had high hopes for this book because I remember reading "Smith" in my early years and thoroughly enjoyed it. I was not expecting to be enthralled in the same way that I was by Garfield's other effort, but I did expect to read a story that evoked the Victorian period with a plot strong enough to cross the child - adult divide. Unfortunately, "Devil - in - the - Fog" does not quite reach the necessary heights. The story centres around the hero George who, as a 13 - year - old, finds himself swapping families. As the story progresses, sinister characters and strange behaviour begin to seep out of cracks and crawl from under stones leading to the big twist at the conclusion. For most, this novel will be different and rather exciting. For me, the excellent turn of phrase, imagery and humour employed by the author are in unfortunate contrast with the slightly convenient, occasionally confusing and ultimately disappointing plot. I do recommend this book, but I do warn the reader that it may come across a little thin in parts.