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Download The Last River: The Tragic Race For Shangri-la ePub

by Todd Balf

Download The Last River: The Tragic Race For Shangri-la ePub
  • ISBN 0375416315
  • ISBN13 978-0375416316
  • Language English
  • Author Todd Balf
  • Publisher Random House Audio; Abridged edition (September 12, 2000)
  • Formats lit mobi txt doc
  • Category Travels
  • Subcategory Asia
  • Size ePub 1135 kb
  • Size Fb2 1661 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 106

It is a challenge few top kayakers could resist.  The Tsangpo remains one of the world's few uncharted, unconquered whitewater rivers, epic in both scale and beauty.  Plunging 10,000 vertical feet, its waters run beneath snowcapped Himalayan peaks, past verdant jungle, and through the treacherous Tsangpo Gorge.  Ancient Buddhist monastic textx name the region Pemako and suggest a real-life Shangri-La within its unexplored depths, along with mist-shrouded waterfalls and other wonders witnessed by few, if any, human eyes.In October 1998, a team of four expert kayakers, partially funded by the National Geographic Society, attempted the first end-to-end descent of the gorge.  The expedition ended in tragedy when the team's strongest paddler, Doug Gordon, executing a perilous but not impossible jump, was swept into the river's main current and never seen again.The Last River is the story of that ill-fated adventure and a riveting evocationof one of our planet's wildest and most alluring places.  In the words of an eighth-century monk, "Even to take one single step toward Pemako is to be liberated from mundane existence."

This was the magical Shangri-la of legend, a 140-mile-long canyon framed by 25,000-foot snowcapped peaks, a place of. .

This was the magical Shangri-la of legend, a 140-mile-long canyon framed by 25,000-foot snowcapped peaks, a place of unimaginable beauty called Pemako in ancient Buddhist texts that was rumored to contain mammoth waterfalls. The Last River is also a riveting journey to one of the world's wildest and most alluring places, a thrilling book that invites us into the Himalayas of Jon Krakauer's classic, Into Thin Air, but from a totally new perspective - on a historic river so remote that only the most hardy and romantic souls attempt to unlock its mysteries.

Электронная книга "The Last River: The Tragic Race for Shangri-la", Todd Balf. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Last River: The Tragic Race for Shangri-la" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

This race is to blame for Todd Balf's faltering missteps. In a book obstensibly about kayaking the last great untamed river, there's almost no kayaking. Some guys plan a trip, things go wrong, they go home, and people argue about it in Internet newsgroups

This race is to blame for Todd Balf's faltering missteps. Some guys plan a trip, things go wrong, they go home, and people argue about it in Internet newsgroups. There's no bone-pounding thrill of whitewater; the river is just cubic feet per second.

For Wick Walker and Tom McEwan, extreme whitewater pioneers, best friends, and trip leaders, the Tsangpo adventure was the culmination of a twenty-five-year quest for glory. This race is to blame for Todd Balf's faltering missteps.

Todd Balf chronicles a team of kayakers as they embark on an incredible journey to paddle the dangerous whitewater of the remote Yarlung Tsangpo River as it carves out one of the deepest gorges through Tibet while flowing away from the Himalayas. Despite record high level waters which made running the river exponentially more difficult and dangerous, the team decides to boat what they can and portage the rest.

Todd Balf's The Last River was a very compelling read about something I know little about - the sport, adventure and competition of white water kayaking.

The Last River avoids speculating. We also have a free book recycling program for old textbooks, encyclopedias, and damaged books. Visit Seller's Storefront.

Clothing Balf does a great job describing not only the people involved in this tragic adventure, but just how dangerous it really was. Balf also is wonderful in giving cultural, historical an.

This is the story of that ill-fated adventure and a riveting evocation of one of the planet's wildest and most alluring places. Balf does a great job describing not only the people involved in this tragic adventure, but just how dangerous it really was. Balf also is wonderful in giving cultural, historical and geographical backbone to the Tibetan landscape.

The Last River: The Tragic Race for Shangri-La (Paperback). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Running through the southwest corner of Tibet, the Tsangpo River is the last and most dangerous uncharted whitewater passage. It is also a place of extraordinary beauty, coursing through snow capped mountain ranges and ripping through verdant jungle. It is no wonder that local legend has this place as the sacred site of Shangri-La.

Talk about The Last River: The Tragic Race For Shangri-la


MeGa_NunC
There are troubling questions in The Last River that are never fully dealt with: Did our intrepid kayakers blunder into a dangerous situation because they were racing others to be the first to explore and conquer a new territory? Were they pressured by big money sponsors to move forward with an ill-timed expedition?
Well, there's been another race, too, a rush among big-money publishers to be the first to capitalize on the Tsangpo saga. This race is to blame for Todd Balf's faltering missteps. In a book obstensibly about kayaking the last great untamed river, there's almost no kayaking. Some guys plan a trip, things go wrong, they go home, and people argue about it in Internet newsgroups.
There's no bone-pounding thrill of whitewater; the river is just cubic feet per second. The landscape isn't spiritual or ugly or haunted or massive; it's just a curvy line on a globe. And the kayakers aren't driven or psychotic or lonely or deluded; they're just pins on a map. And the pins are all the same color.
Balf wasn't there, and the people who were haven't shared much with him, and it shows. Don't buy this book; don't read this book.
Xwnaydan
Very well written with interesting in depth background of the region and the paddlers. The last 50 pages or so were mostly about the reaction of the pading community to the tragic death of one of the team. I lost I interest in that part
spark
i realy enjoyed this book. i am a whitewater kayaker myself, and i was very interested in the planning and dynamics of the expedition. it seemed like real life to me. the only thing i wish is that there were some photos or maps...
MilsoN
I enjoyed it completely.
Rigiot
Even with our satellite photos, gps and other technical advances, nature still has the last word. I hope this river is never tamed!
great ant
The book The Last River I have odered came fast and in excellent condition. I was very satisfied.
SupperDom
Like others, I wondered at the number of people who slammed this book, which I found to be gripping, enjoyable, and in places hard to read for all the right reasons. The answer is simple: this book is not written for the armchair adventurer, for someone who will watch the Discovery Channel but never actually go to any of those places they'll see on the screen. It tells some hard truths, and I can easily understand why those who bought the book hoping to be entertained by someone else's tragedy would be greatly disappointed. If, however, you've ever been closer to real adventure than picturing yourself in an SUV ad, I have a feeling this book will work for you.

It is not a fun book. No book with a tragedy at its center should be fun or light reading, really. But it is fascinating, compelling, a page-turner. It is highly educational, particularly for those who are inclined to view adventure athletes as brain-dead adrenaline junkies. By taking the reader through the expedition members' hard work and preparation, the hassles and hardships they endured, the book forces us to see them as being in many ways the antithesis of the stereotype: they are patient, painstaking, and thorough.

The bottom line is that this book isn't the literary equivalent of America's Most Death-Defying Videos. It's not written to titillate the folks back home. It seeks to tell the truth about a pursuit that many people find simply incomprehensible. If read with an open mind and without an expectation of being thrilled by death-defying feats, I think it will give the reader that understanding.
"Extreme", "lantern jawed", "boulders the size of buildings". Mix these three cliches, stir in an almost incomprehensible mix of first names and some [partial] biographies and you have the essence of Todd Balf's The Last River - The Tragic Race of Shangri-La. Ostensibly the tale of a river exploration by kayak gone awry it's focus is continuously blurred by disorganized snippets of arcana and personal information about the participants and (too many) peripheral players in this tale of a grand scheme gone bad. The real tragedy of this story seems to be the fact that Balf is the self- appointed chronicler of it. Balf continuously mires the reader in minutiae that is scattered seemingly hodge-podge throughout the story. The timeline of the book wavers between serpentine and non-existent and further clouds an already confusing tale. The story itself, the story of a group of experienced paddlers seeking the ultimate challenge on one of the mightiest rivers in the far east, has unlimited potential to be engaging. Instead, Balf scrawls such a circuitous, hackneyed missive, that the weakly developed principal characters rush down a river of unpredictable, choppy and confusing prose long before they reach the river that shares those qualities. In the Author's Note Balf writes of his struggle to give shape to an original article about the topic of his book. The reader is predisposed to think that Balf underwent the same struggle with the book..and lost. Balf seems overwhelmed by the topic at hand: too much information, too much forced drama and too many characters have resulted in an unruly pastiche of a story. In the end it is the story that suffers: the clarity of the participant's vision has been lost, the essence of the experience that beckoned them left unexplored. For [the money] CAN there are more entrancing journeys for the reader to take.