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Download Kokoro: Hints and Echoes of Japanese Inner Life ePub

by Lafcadio Hearn

Download Kokoro: Hints and Echoes of Japanese Inner Life ePub
  • ISBN 0837116333
  • ISBN13 978-0837116334
  • Language English
  • Author Lafcadio Hearn
  • Publisher Praeger (December 28, 1969)
  • Pages 388
  • Formats rtf mobi txt doc
  • Category Travels
  • Subcategory Asia
  • Size ePub 1730 kb
  • Size Fb2 1283 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 219


Kokoro: Hints and Echoes of Japanese Inner Life (1896). Books and Habits; from the Lectures of Lafcadio Hearn (1968, Books for Libraries Press). Writings from Japan: An Anthology (1984, Penguin Books).

Kokoro: Hints and Echoes of Japanese Inner Life (1896). Gleanings in Buddha-Fields: Studies of Hand and Soul in the Far East (1897). The Boy who Drew Cats, (1897). Lafcadio Hearn's Japan: An Anthology of His Writings on the Country and Its People (2007, Tuttle). American Writings (2009, Library of America).

Kokoro: Hints and Echoes. has been added to your Cart. Rather than attempt a direct translation, Lafcadio Hearn offers a selection of stories focusing on Japanese inner life, so that by the end you will understand kokoro. The stories follow Hearn's particular interests of Japanese folklore and the vanishing culture of which he found himself a part in post-Meji Japan. Each story is a slice of life focusing on Japanese character, morals and feelings. This is what the Japanese people care about, what they think is important, what is inside. The selected tales are non-judgmental and non-orientalist.

Hearn penned three more books concerned with Japan and Japanese culture. Amongst the best-remembered of these are his collections of Japanese ghost stories and legends, such as Japanese Fairy Tales (1898) and Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things (1903)

Hearn penned three more books concerned with Japan and Japanese culture. Amongst the best-remembered of these are his collections of Japanese ghost stories and legends, such as Japanese Fairy Tales (1898) and Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things (1903). Kearn died in Tokyo, Japan in 1904, aged 54.

Kokoro: Hints and Echos of Japanese Inner Life

Kokoro: Hints and Echos of Japanese Inner Life. Lafcadio Hearn, one of the few outsiders to really understand New Orleans, lived the last 14 years of his life in Japan, from 1890 to 1904. Kokoro offer vignettes and interpretations of life and meaning in Japan at that time, and still offers some instruction about life and the mode of living there since.

II. The genius of japanese civilization.

Kokoro : Hints and Echoes of Japanese Inner Life. Much may have changed since author Lafcadio Hearn (1850-1904) fell in love with Japan, but the 'hints and echoes' of the subtitle still have a remarkable ring to them. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780804836609. Release Date:March 2005.

The 15 classic essays collected in Kokoro examine the inner spiritual life .

The 15 classic essays collected in Kokoro examine the inner spiritual life of Japan. The title itself can be translated as "heart," "spirit" or "inner meaning," and that's exactly what this collection teaches us about Japan. As an early interpreter of Japan to the West, Lafcadio Hearn was without parallel in his time. His numerous books about that country were read with a fascination that was a tribute to his keen powers of observation and the vividness of his descriptions.

Talk about Kokoro: Hints and Echoes of Japanese Inner Life


Qucid
Lafcadio Hearn lived in Japan in the Victorian era when it was opening to the Western world and going through great change and upheaval. He was a keen observer of the society and it's mind, often commenting on the barrier between Japanese and Western world view. Hearn switches between macro and micro view, first giving an overview of a political movement and its results, then examining the upbringing and development of a particular class of people. Hearn educates the reader on the historical grounding of the Japan we know today. Highly recommended. Clear, concise writing. Interesting subject.
Weiehan
If you are interested in truly understanding the real Japan of the recent past and even today, then you have to read Hearn.
Pedora
Very dry.
Kelerana
I actually found this book quite interesting. It was written in the 1800's and provides an most allegorical explanation of Japanese cultural history. Quite an enjoyable read and does indeed provide information that is useful to understanding this almost mystical,beautiful country.
Perius
"Kokoro" is a difficult word to translate from Japanese to English. Heart, Spirit, Way of Being...it is all of these things. Rather than attempt a direct translation, Lafcadio Hearn offers a selection of stories focusing on Japanese inner life, so that by the end you will understand kokoro.

The stories follow Hearn's particular interests of Japanese folklore and the vanishing culture of which he found himself a part in post-Meji Japan. Each story is a slice of life focusing on Japanese character, morals and feelings. This is what the Japanese people care about, what they think is important, what is inside.

The selected tales are non-judgmental and non-orientalist. This is no attempt to explain or highlight the "strange" Japanese, but merely a record and an illumination, in the best sense of the term.

The collected stories:

"At a Railway Station"
"The Genius of Japanese Civilization"
"A Street Singer"
"From a Traveling Diary"
"The Nun of the Temple of Amida"
"After the War"
"Haru"
"A Glimpse of Tendencies"
"By Force of Karma"
"A Conservative"
"In the Twilight of the Gods"
"The Idea of Pre-Exsistance"
"In Cholera Time"
"Some Thoughts about Ancestor Worship"
"Kimiko"
Mightsinger
"Kokoro" is a difficult word to translate from Japanese to English. Heart, Spirit, Way of Being...it is all of these things. Rather than attempt a direct translation, Lafcadio Hearn offers a selection of stories focusing on Japanese inner life, so that by the end you will understand kokoro.
The stories follow Hearn's particular interests of Japanese folklore and the vanishing culture of which he found himself a part in post-Meji Japan. Each story is a slice of life focusing on Japanese character, morals and feelings. This is what the Japanese people care about, what they think is important, what is inside.
The selected tales are non-judgmental and non-orientalist. This is no attempt to explain or highlight the "strange" Japanese, but merely a record and an illumination, in the best sense of the term.
The collected stories:
"At a Railway Station"
"The Genius of Japanese Civilization"
"A Street Singer"
"From a Traveling Diary"
"The Nun of the Temple of Amida"
"After the War"
"Haru"
"A Glimpse of Tendencies"
"By Force of Karma"
"A Conservative"
"In the Twilight of the Gods"
"The Idea of Pre-Exsistance"
"In Cholera Time"
"Some Thoughts about Ancestor Worship"
"Kimiko"
Beanisend
Not to be confused with Natsume Soseki's novel by the same title, Lafcadio Hearn's "Kokoro" is a magnificent collection of essays, vignettes, memoirs, and meditations on Japan in the 1890's. Very much a product of the mid-Meiji period, these masterfully-written little literary pieces are nonetheless timeless. Each piece is quite different from the rest, and yet almost all of them manage to start from everyday incidents or obvious observations and gradually spiral inwards to some deeply moving and startling insight into Japanese attitudes, values, and worldviews; more than once this seemingly methodless method allows Hearn to share with the reader certain common opinions and normal spiritual orientations held by average Japanese folks--the kinds of things usually taken for granted and so unarticulated, hence least amenable to documentation and scholarship (especially of the time, but even today). And Hearn does all this with an unpretentious erudition and an understated and balanced sympathy for his subject that, along with his literary flair for wonderfully clear and flowing prose, places his writings here in a category far above the rest. With him we can find none of the unintentional strains of condescension and orientalism so typical of folklore and religious anthropology, for while he's looking with the surprised gaze of the outsider with one eye, his other eye is that of the insider feeling very much at home where he is. The resulting view is visionary--but in subdued and shadowy tones.

Appendix on an Appendix: in addition to the fifteen excellent essays forming the main body of "Kokoro", there's an extensive appendix featuring Hearn's translations of three popular folk ballads: "The Ballad of Shuntoku-Maru", "The Ballad of Oguri Hangwan" and "The Ballad of O-Shichi, the Daughter of the Yaoya". These are fascinating on a number of levels. They provide a tantalizingly fleeting glimpse of plebian drama, remarkable in its very lack of remarkableness. There's a certain sociological angle, as the versions of these oral ballads collected and translated by Hearn are those recited by mountain outcastes in the area of today's Shimane Prefecture. Religiously the first two ballads are key in understanding popular attitudes concerning pilgrimage in Japan--the first demonstrating a creepy (almost voodoo) edge in Kannon faith at Kiyomizudera Temple, the second delightfully exaggerating the rejuvenating benefits of Kumano and its sacred hot springs. Meanwhile, the third ballad is a straightforwardly melodramatic retelling of a true story better known to us today in a more refined and literary version as found in the novelist Saikaku's "Five Women Who Loved Love" of 1686.