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Download Lonely Planet Spain (Country Guide) ePub

by Damien Simonis,Sarah Andrews,Stuart Butler,Anthony Ham,John Noble,Josephine Quintero,Miles Roddis,Arpi Armenakian Shively

Download Lonely Planet Spain (Country Guide) ePub

Lonely Planet SpainAscend the lofty La Sagrada Familia, then track down Gaudi's superb, lesser-known worksRow vigorously over the lake at Madrid's Parque del Buen RetiroRelax with Basque tapas and white wine in the bars of San Sebastian's Parte ViejaWander home to your casa rural as night falls and silence envelops the narrow village streetsIn This Guide:Nine authors, 4964 kilometers of coastline, 18 exuberant regionsFull-color sections on green travel and the best of Spanish food and drinkDedicated chapter on the Camino de Santiago by Galician resident and walking guide Nancy FreyContent updated daily: visit lonelyplanet.com

I recently purchased Lonely Planet Discover Spain for a two-month study .

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. I recently purchased Lonely Planet Discover Spain for a two-month study abroad that I would be doing out of Madrid. Many of my friends had either Rick Steves' Spain 2011 with map or Lonely Planet Spain (Full Color Country Travel Guide), both of which contained 5-6x as much information and definitely were alot more useful, and cost a few dollars less.

Ham, Anthony; Andrews, Sarah; Butler, Stuart; Quintero, Josephine; Noble, John; Shively, Arpi Armenakian; Roddis, Miles; Simonis, Damien. Published by Lonely Planet.

Anthony Ham; Sarah Andrews; Stuart Butler; John Noble; Josephine Quintero; Miles Roddis; Arpi Armenakian Shively; Damien Simonis Lonely Planet Discover Spain (Full Color Country Travel Guide). ISBN 13: 9781741799972. Lonely Planet Discover Spain (Full Color Country Travel Guide). Ham, Anthony; Andrews, Sarah; Butler, Stuart; Quintero, Josephine; Noble, John; Shively, Arpi Armenakian; Roddis, Miles; Simonis, Damien. ISBN 10: 174179997X ISBN 13: 9781741799972.

Damien Simonis, Stuart Butler. Anthony Ham., John Noble. I purchased this guide while living in Asturias and basically ripped it to shreds in rain and shine (Madrid downpour was not kind to the pages). There's something for every travel taste in here, and it covers every corner of Spain.

Lonely Planet guides are, quite simply, like no other'.

by Anthony Ham, Sarah Andrews, Stuart Butler, John Noble, Josephine . by John Noble, Mark Elliott, Michael Kohn, Arpi Armenakian Shively.

by Anthony Ham, Sarah Andrews, Stuart Butler, John Noble, Josephine Quintero, Miles Roddis, Arpi Armenakian Shively, Damien Simonis. ISBN 9781741799972 (978-1-74179-997-2) Softcover, Lonely Planet, 2010. Lonely Planet Georgia Armenia & Azerbaijan (Multi Country Travel Guide). ISBN 9781741044775 (978-1-74104-477-5) Softcover, Lonely Planet, 2008.

Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher Lonely Planet's Discover Spain is. .Check out Lonely Planet's Spain guide. I bought this book for a recent trip to Spain, only to discover that it DOES NOT COVER entire regions, such as the region where I was traveling, Asturias.

Lonely Planet: The world's leading travel guide publisher Lonely Planet's Discover Spain is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Marvel at stunning architecture, enjoy tapas and pintxos, and hike through the Pyrenees; all with your trusted travel companion. I think it mentioned one or two cities in Asturias).

Lonely Planet Spain (Spain, 3rd ed) By Damien Simonis. Lonely Planet Spain (Travel Guide) By Lonely Planet,Anthony Ham,Stuart Butler,J. Lonely Planet Walking in Spain By Miles Roddis,Matthew Fletcher,Nancy Frey,John. Lonely Planet Spain (Spain, 3rd ed) By Damien Simonis. Lonely Planet Spain By Damien Simonis. Lonely Planet World Food Spain By Richard Sterling, Allison Jones.

by Lonely Planet (Author), Anthony Ham (Author), Stuart Butler (Author), Kerry Christiani (Author), Isabella Noble (Author), John Noble (Author), Josephine Quintero (Author), Brendan Sainsbury (Author), Regis St. Louis (Author), Andy Symington (Author) & 7 more.

Lonely Planet, Anthony Ham, Gregor Clark, Duncan Garwood, Catherine Le Nevez, John Noble . Stuart Butler, Anthony Ham, Brendan Sainsbury, John Noble, Regis St Loius, Anna Kaminski, Andy Symington, Miles Roddis.

Lonely Planet, Anthony Ham, Gregor Clark, Duncan Garwood, Catherine Le Nevez, John Noble, Brendan Sainsbury, Regis St Louis, Andy Symington, Sally Davies.

item 5 Lonely Planet Spain (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Ham, Anthony, Butler, Stua -Lonely Planet Spain (Travel Guide) by.Italy by Duncan Garwood, Miles Roddis, Damien Simonis, Wendy Owen (Paperback, 2004).

item 5 Lonely Planet Spain (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Ham, Anthony, Butler, Stua -Lonely Planet Spain (Travel Guide) by Lonely Planet, Ham, Anthony, Butler, Stua. The Rough Guide to France by Rough Guides (Paperback, 2016).

Talk about Lonely Planet Spain (Country Guide)


JoJolar
There is simply nothing like a 'Lonely Planet' book to teach you about other countries, and this one is no exception. The problem with all of the 'Lonely Planet' books is that as they have gotten newer editions, the look, feel and approach to travel has changed, and not for the better. I much prefer the older books, like this edition, as they give a better degree of information about the locations.

If you want a good book which really focuses on traveling, then any Lonely Planet book is good for you. But if you want a little more meat to your travel guide, then stick with an older edition, like this one. You won't be sorry.
Laizel
I'm an American living in Madrid; bought this book for a driving tour of the north: Galicia, Asturias, Cantabria, Euskadi, and Navarre. I've not yet tried it on the south of the country. I've used Lonely Planet for 10 years and approximately 30 countries.

I found this book to be dissapointing for the following reasons:

1. A lot of info in the book is outdated, like they just left stuff in from 2007 without checking it. It's more than just closed restaraunts and discotechs (although they exist in spades) - there are huge swathes of highway missing from the maps. A lot of this was editorial sloppiness - for example the map of Spain in the front of the book has some of the new highways, but the province maps at the start of each chapter do not.

2. It leaves off Ceuta, Melilla, and the Canary Islands. The Canaries are clearly missing because LP wants to gouge you for a second book (they do a similar scam with the US state of Hawaii), but why are Ceuta and Melilla missing? The book is very preachy about getting off the traditional tourist track, and those two cities (which are Spanish enclaves on the North African coast) have unique cultures and really rely on tourism to survive. It is especially galling bc the book instructs you how to take the ferry to Morroco from Algecieras, without ever mentioning that you can easily go to Ceuta just 20 kilos away on the same boat. It smacked of political correctness of not wanting to offend the 5 Morrocans that might purchase this book.

3. My opinion is that the booked lacked a sense of itself. For example, it might only tell you how to get to a city by bus or train, as if the reader is likely to be a student that is too young/poor to rent a car. But, after "getting there", the accomodation options will center on quaint inns out of town at a price of 120 euros a night, which someone arriving by bus could not reach or afford. Other times the book goes the exact opposite direction, for example by telling you to drive the 5 kilos from Malpica to St. Hadrian when there is a beautiful coastal walk (complete with boardwalks) that passes several sheltered coves, beaches, fountains, and picnic parks, as if only older drivers and never anyone fit would be on the Costa Morte. The book tries to be both "Fodors" and "Rough Guide" at once, and comes off not being as good as either.

4. Far too much space is devoted to food. For example, octopus is the traditional dish of Galicia, but do I really need to know 5 different octopus restaraunts in every city, and 2 in every small town? No one wants to eat that much octopus, and I can just look at the signs anyway. At least for me, I get in the car and drive Spain to see the sights, not to eat stuff that I could just buy in Madrid without difficulty. This seemed to relate to the book's lack of sense of itself - the huge focus on food is clearly meant to appeal to the fat American cruise ship crowd that would normally buy a Rick Steves guide. But it really turned me off as the traditional LP customer (young professional with lots of travel experience). And the vegetarian advice is severely lacking, even where vegetarianism is easy like Madrid. Please LP - less food, more sights.

5. The book alternates between a snide tone and an overwhelmingly positive one, without directly stating the reasons for either. For example, the town of Arena at the base of the Picos is described as "singularly unimpressive". But why? It has a nice river park, plenty to eat and drink, and is the obvious base to start the gorge walks. The real reason is that it is a tourist trap for Madrilenos taking day trips, so there are a ton of stores selling "local artisen" products at a 1000% mark up from the same item in the supermarket 50 meters away. So, why not just tell me that, a la "Note that often the 'local artisan' products are really mass produced items available at supermarkets for substantially lower prices.". I appreciate directness.

6. A minor complaint - the book wastes a lot of space writing out that places are wheelchair accessible. A simple picture of a wheelchair (like a handicapped spot) would suffice. Such symbols are already used for things like accomodation (a house) and dining (a fork and knife), so this is a no brainer.

Rolled together, these issues made the book less enjoyable for me than a typical LP product. That said, it does provide a lot of information and can really guide you through most of the country, hence my "fair" rating. If I had it to do again I would look at the other guides first before reaching for this one, which is contrary to my usual always-buy-LP standard. Happy travels!
Kezan
I purchased the Lonely Planet for my mother who was taking a trip to Spain this past summer. She loved it and to be honest I have never been disappointed by a Lonely Planet travel book. They are ideal and practical not only pointing out travel spots but also places that are both economical and expensive so you the traveler can have a rounded experience. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone considering or traveling to Spain.
allegro
My main difficulty with the Kindle edition of this guide is that the links don't go to the right places. I initially found this to be a major source of frustration. To find the spot were the topic is elaborated I needed to do a search & even then I might not find it.
Additional note: I have found, since I wrote this review initially, that if I set the type size to the very smallest possible setting the links seem to go to the right places much of the time.
Vishura
Carry this half a way around the world. was helpful to have a birdseye view of all the different cities of Spain. It's a big country, but this book is heavy to carry everywhere even though I read from cover to cover.
Dalallador
Traveling alone through unusual parts of Spain made this book a necessity. Really useful to know where to stay, what to expect, what to do, how to get there.
Maman
gift
I have the 2009 and the 2011 Lonely Planet Spain books, and it is amazing how much better the older edition is. If you want maximum information about Spain, hotels, restaurants, etc and easy to read maps, then buy the 2009 edition. If you want more pictures, less information, and less detailed maps, buy the 2011 edition.