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Download Andalus : Unlocking the Secrets of Moorish Spain ePub

by Jason Webster

Download Andalus : Unlocking the Secrets of Moorish Spain ePub
  • ISBN 0385605072
  • ISBN13 978-0385605076
  • Language English
  • Author Jason Webster
  • Publisher Transworld Pub; First Edition edition (March 31, 2004)
  • Pages 285
  • Formats mbr txt azw doc
  • Category Travels
  • Subcategory Europe
  • Size ePub 1432 kb
  • Size Fb2 1951 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 515

Spain's Moorish past is evident everywhere you look. For centuries, Christians, Muslims and Jews lived in Spain side by side in peace, and it was home to some of the greatest minds in the world. After the Moors' expulsion in the seventeenth century, much of their knowledge, skill and artistry was lost. Jason Webster originally travelled to Spain to play the flamenco guitar. A qualified Arabist, he now embarks on a quest for Spain's forgotten Arab legacy, and gets embroiled with characters who are as wild and original as those he described so vividly in Duende. What lessons can we learn today from the harmony that existed for so long in medieval Spain - and from the subsequent expulsion of its Muslims and Jews?

Jason Webster originally travelled to Spain to play the flamenco guitar. The two friends parted in Casablanca after a true adventure to "unlock the secrets of Moorish Spain".

Jason Webster originally travelled to Spain to play the flamenco guitar. A qualified Arabist, he now embarks on a quest for Spain's forgotten Arab legacy, and gets embroiled with characters who are as wild and original as those he described so vividly in Duende.

Jason Webster explains the historic important of the debt to the Islamic world in the text of this book as Europe was lifted out of. .

The two friends parted in Casablanca after a true adventure to "unlock the secrets of Moorish Spain".

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Andalus: Unlocking The Secrets Of Moorish Spain as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Brought up in England, Jason Webster has lived for many years in Spain. His Max Cámara series of crime novels started with Or the Bull Kills You, which was was longlisted for the CWA Specsavers Crime Thriller Awards New Blood Dagger 2011

Unlocking the Secrets of Moorish Spain.

Unlocking the Secrets of Moorish Spain.

Mark Cocker follows Jason Webster on a cheery quest for Spain's Arabic roots in Andalus. Given the recent devastating terrorist attacks in Madrid, there seems to be an eerie prescience to Jason Webster's book on the long, troubled and complex relationship between Islam and Spanish society. Webster is an Anglo-American Arabist with a passion for flamenco music and has made his home in Spain for the last decade. A chance book purchase in the largely Muslim quarter of his wife's home city, Valencia, sets Webster off on a personal quest for the Moorish antecedents of his adopted country.

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Author:Webster, Jason. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. Read full description.

Webster is the author of twelve books on Spain, ranging from travel to history and detective fiction Andalus: Unlocking the secrets of Moorish Spain (2004, Doubleday, ISBN 0385605072) examines the deep impact left on Spain – an.

Webster is the author of twelve books on Spain, ranging from travel to history and detective fiction. Guerra: Living in the shadows of the Spanish Civil War (2006, Black Swan

As Islam and the West prepare to clash once again, Jason Webster embarks on a quest to discover Spain's hidden Moorish legacy and lift the lid on a country once forged by both Muslims and Christians.

As Islam and the West prepare to clash once again, Jason Webster embarks on a quest to discover Spain's hidden Moorish legacy and lift the lid on a country once forged by both Muslims and Christians. He meets Zine, a young illegal immigrant from Morocco, a twenty-first century Moor, lured over with the promise of a job but exploited as a slave labourer on a fruit farm. Jason's life is threatened as he investigates the agricultural gulag, Zine rescues him, and the unlikely pair of writer and desperado take off on a rollercoaster ride through Andalucia.

Talk about Andalus : Unlocking the Secrets of Moorish Spain


Vichredag
Jason Webster explains the historic important of the debt to the Islamic world in the text of this book as Europe was lifted out of the Dark Ages by Muslims, Christians and Jews integrating in Spain, creating an important fusion of ancient literatures, philosophy, mathematics, science, and medicine that have had a significant impact on Western cultural and intellectual pursuits over the years.

The wonderful story of Zine, the Moor from Morocco, and Jasie, his English friend and graduate from Oxford University in Arabic languages , who travel through Spain and Portugal meeting many people, discovering the wonders of this period in history and the Arabic roots of many Spanish words, poetry, food, songs and dance, known as flamenco. The two friends parted in Casablanca after a true adventure to "unlock the secrets of Moorish Spain".

We are also taken through Spanish history during the time of the Inquisition, that lasted some 300 years when the Jewish and Moorish cultures were obliterated, resembling the atrocities of the Nazis against the Jews, and others that opposed Fascism, and what we are now seeing in the fight against IS, the Islamic State.

After reading this book you can form your own opinion on this fascinating period in history, that some say is romanticized and some say it never happened. Al-Andalus is the root of my culture and many of my values that inspire me to communicate with different religious and ethnic groups in all the continents I have visited. This has convinced me to believe in this event in history as a model for Peace between these three religions that are now dividing the world in bloody wars and destruction.

Jason Webster has the same passion for Al-Andalus, that I have described in my publication
"Convivencia A Model for Peace between Christian, Muslim and Jewish Cultures. War against ISIS, Peace in Syria, What next?"
<Convivencia A Model for Peace between Christian, Muslim and Jewish Cultures. War against ISIS, Peace in Syria, What .pdf>
Jelar
Very much a top-of-the-head effort by a not really talented writer. Theme is that most of contemporary Spanish culture really has its roots in Arabic. Given that the Arabs ruled Spain for 800 years, that's not much of s surprise. The reason I consider it a waste of time and money is that his "evidence " is only the citing of Spanish words and phrases which, he says, sound like Arabic words.
Shalizel
This book by the master of expat Spanish writing Jason Webster tells the tales of deepest Andalusia in this fantastic potted history. Only wonder is why they have a running bull from the Navarre region of Pamplona on this updated cover...very strange - mine has a relevant flamenco dancer on it. Have a word, Jason!
greed style
I glanced at this book, which was on display in the English-language section of a Frankfurt bookstore, and ended up buying it and reading it in a day, it was so absorbing. I've always thought Spain was a country of hidden history-- I once met a man whose Spanish-Jewish family had kept their religion alive for centuries while pretending to be ordinary Catholics to avoid persecution. Spain also has Visigothic, pre-Roman and Moorish roots, and was at the core of the Roman empire.
Jason Webster, who speaks Arabic and Spanish and has a Spanish wife, starts off on his journey around Spain with the idea that 800 years of Moorish identity must have left many traces in Spain beyond the obvious ones of architecture and language. For many years this was suppressed; the Moors had always been the enemy, the other. After the Reconquest in 1492, they were first forced to convert and then expelled from Spain.

Webster sees Moorish Spain as an idyllic place where Jews, Muslims and Christians lived happily together in tolerance, bringing knowledge and sophistication to benighted Europe. This has not been the view of most Spaniards over the centuries, but he makes a good argument for it in the book. A scholar of Moorish Spain would not learn much from this book (but would still be amused by the travelogue) but most of us have a lot to remember about how much the Moors gave us: sugar, cotton, paper, oranges, and of course the crucial zero.

The second thread in the book happened accidentally. While secretly interviewing slave laborers on a farm near Valencia, Spain, the writer is rescued from violent farmers by an illegal Moroccan immigrant named Zine. Jason feels an obligation to Zine and ends up taking him with him around Spain, trying to find Zine a job. Zine seems mostly interested in sleeping with as many Spanish women as possible, but surprises himself by falling in love with Lucia, a friend of Jason's wife. The theme of Spain and the Moors perfectly illustrated, it seems! But as in history, there is no happy ending.

The most interesting parts of the book, for me, were the flashes of Moorish life still alive in Spain. Who knew that "Hola" and "Hala" come from the ubiquitous "Allah"? Once I saw a North African male troupe of dancers using many of the same gestures and movements as a woman flamenco dancer in Granada in Spain. Even some typically Spanish dishes turn out to come from the Moors. The author interviews two experts on Moorish Spain, who have opposite points of view, a flamenco dancer, a Spanish convert to Islam, and a scion of an ancient royal family. He has a way of spotting the revealing detail, of seeing the vulnerability in even the most obnoxious person. He must be a bizarrely good listener. I for one could not sit and nod while someone told me that the Americans bombed the World Trade Center themselves.

My two main criticisms of the book are that, first of all, the author does not show the respect for Christian culture that he lavishes on Moorish Islam-- every mention of a church or priest or religious custom seems to be snide. He never asks the question: how did the Spaniards keep the fight NOT to be Moorish alive for 800 years?

The more important criticism is that the most devastating difference between Christian Spain and Muslim Morocco (seen as the heirs of the Moors) is passed over in silence: women. In the book, Westerners and Muslim men speak. Muslim women, of course, do not. A Queen Isabella of the Reconquest could never have happened in Andalus. The fact that Zine pursues the freer Spanish women like a randy animal is seen as a lovable quirk, rather than a commonplace consequence of his Islamic upbringing, in which women are either to be exploited or dominated. Yet this common and ancient Muslim male attitude is one of the biggest problems facing not just modern Spain but the world. I believe that the author thinks he has said something, in subtle fashion, on the subject; but considering his passion while describing the golden age of Andalus and the prejudices Moroccans face in Spain today, he could have been a little less subtle about one of the main reasons those prejudices exist.

Still, a fine book. I hope to see many more from Jason Webster.