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Download Dynasty’s End: Bill Russell and the1968-69 World Champion Boston Celtics (Sportstown Series) ePub

by Thomas J. Whalen

Download Dynasty’s End: Bill Russell and the1968-69 World Champion Boston Celtics (Sportstown Series) ePub
  • ISBN 1555536433
  • ISBN13 978-1555536435
  • Language English
  • Author Thomas J. Whalen
  • Publisher Northeastern University Press (July 1, 2005)
  • Pages 288
  • Formats mbr azw docx mobi
  • Category Travels
  • Subcategory United States
  • Size ePub 1867 kb
  • Size Fb2 1554 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 517

The Boston Celtics of the Bill Russell era were one of the greatest dynasties in sports history. During the thirteen years that Hall of Fame center Russell dominated the court, the Celtics won eleven world championships, including an unprecedented eight straight between 1959 and 1966. In the 1968-69 season, the aging and injury-riddled team finished in fourth place during the regular season, and sportswriters predicted an early defeat in the playoffs. Against all odds, player-coach Russell and his squad rallied to beat the heavily-favored Philadelphia '76ers and New York Knicks, and captured the championship crown in a dramatic upset of Wilt Chamberlain, Elgin Baylor, Jerry West and the Los Angeles Lakers in the closing seconds of the final game of the series. The following summer, Russell stunned the sports world by announcing his retirement, ending his and the Celtics' celebrated reign. In this vivid and lively account, Thomas J. Whalen chronicles Russell's memorable last season and the Celtics' dazzling triumph. Set against the backdrop of the tumultuous 1960s and Boston's own turbulent and bitter struggles with race, he tells the fascinating story of how an improbable championship team overcame poor health, indifferent fans, disruptive personnel changes, and internal morale problems. Whalen recounts how Russell transformed the game of basketball during his remarkable career and revisits the outspoken superstar's conflicted relationship with Boston. He also tells why the Celtics, the first team to break several NBA color lines, failed to attract a loyal following among the city's largely white sports fanatics and press corps.

Whalen, Thomas J. Publication date. Russell, Bill, 1934-, Boston Celtics (Basketball team), Basketball players.

In the 1968-69 season, the aging and .

The Boston Celtics of the Bill Russell era were one of the greatest dynasties.

1968-69 World Champion Boston Celtics (Sportstown) , News Books .

THOMAS J. WHALEN is Assistant Professor of Social Science at Boston University

Celtics Related Books The Boston Celtics and the .

Dynasty's End. Thomas J. Whalen. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read

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MarF
I heard about this book in a Sports Illustrated capsule. The subject matter has always fascinated me -- despite the fact they were defending champs and had won 10 of the previous 12 years, I still consider them the most unlikely (and for that reason compelling) champs in NBA history.
The subject matter is no secret: the Celtics had won most improbably in 1968 by overcoming a 3-1 deficit against the defending champion Sixers - who still had Wilt, and were one year removed from their unbelievable 1967 season, which was arguably the greatest team ever assembled. In '69, the Celtics failed to win their division for the fourth straight year and were in fact the lowest seed in the playoffs. Not only were the Sixers still a force but Baltimore and New York were very much improved. Faltering down the stretch and injury-riddled, the team pulled together for one last run, culminating in an unthinkable game 7 win over Wilt, Jerry West, Elgin Baylor, and the Lakers in LA. Russell retired on top (and STAYED retired), as so few other athletes ever have.
The book is well-written and the author does an excellent job of setting the tone of the era and the city, particularly its indifference to the Celtics and the racist environment that existed. Additionally, the principals' background information was interesting and informative.
In short, if you are interested in NBA history in general or want to read an inspirational story of people working together to reach a common goal, get this book.
Otiel
I feel the book's strength is that you receive in-depth portraits of many of the star's who played for the Boston Celtics in addition to their announcer Johnny Most. In addition we are also provided with descriptions of Wilt Chamberlain and other NBA stars during this time period. Chamberlain, by the way, acquired his nickname "The Big Dipper" by having to often duck when entering through a doorway. However, the title suggests a concentration on the 1968-1969 season, and only the chapters on the playoffs at the end of the book provide us with this information. I enjoyed the book, but I found much of the same information in Bob Cousy's book and Red Auerbach's recent book. In addition, former St. Louis Hawks' superstar, Bob Pettit, the first man to score 20,000 points, had his name spelled incorrectly both times it appeared in the book and also in the index. If you enjoy the Celtics I'm quite sure you will enjoy the book, but I found it to be repetitious in what I found in other books. It is, indeed, unfortunate that this great Celtics team often played before a half empty Boston Garden before fans who really didn't appreciate what they had representing their city.
Anaginn
THIS IS ABOUT THE FINAL YEAR OF THE GREAT DYNASTY OF THE BOSTON CELTICS FROM 1950'S THRU THE 1960'S. ALONG THE WAY THE AUTHOR TELLS A LITTLE ABOUT EACH PLAYER INCLUDING GM RED AUERBACH.ONE OF THE HIGHLIGHTS DISCUSSED ARE THE RACISM GOING AROUND NOT ONLY IN BOSTON BUT IN JUST ABOUT EVERY MAJOR CITY IN THE USA. I ALSO FOUND THE COVERAGE CONCERNING RUSSELL VS WILT VERY WELL WRITTEN AND TO ME THE MOST INTERESTING PART OF THIS VERY GOOD BOOK. IT CENTERS MOSTLY AROUND BILL RUSSELL, AS WE FOUND OUT THAT HE IS INDEED VERY HUMAN ALONG WITH BEING THE ULTIMATE TEAM PLAYER. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS FOR ALL BASKETBALL AND ESPECIALLY CELTIC FANS. WELL WORTH READING.
Zeks Horde
Any Celtic fan that followed the Russell years will love this book. The 1968-69 Celtics
were one of their most interesting teams and certainly their most resourceful.
Hucama
One of the finest books chronicling the last season of the great Bill Russell and his Celtics. Describes the turmoil and racial problems of the sixties.
Forcestalker
Finally, a book to match the drama of the 1968-69 season, and the achievements of those who brought banner #11 to Boston. It seems strange to single out Bill Russell in the subtitle of a book about teamwork achieving common goals. But Russ was always first among equals and in fact remains the greatest winner in sports, period. (From 1955-69 he actually won 14 championships in 15 years, including 3 --- NCAA, Olympics, NBA --- in just over 1 year!) Apart from teams that endured major personal or public tragedies, these Celtics had just about the hardest road to a title. They were ageing with most players (John Havlicek excepted) never performing as well again, and two stars (Russell, Sam Jones) verging on retirement; had enjoyed years of success and might have lacked motivation; and faced several very formidable opponents. The key to this triumph was, as Whalen repeatedly notes, total dedication to the ultimate goal of winning. Russell's Celtics didn't ignore stats; they cared passionately about the only two that matter: their won-lost record and place in the standings. Every playoff opponent had more ability, but none knew so well what winning required. This was markedly true of their Finals foe, the ultra-talented LA Lakers who, at the end, forgot why they were playing and consequently lost.

But "DE" is special because Whalen goes far beyond events on court or in the locker room. He presents key elements of a social and political history of 1960s Boston and America more generally, discussing how indifferent, even hostile, Bostonians were to their perennial champs. The region's virulent race relations were among the obstacles they overcame, winning despite consistent lack of support from area "fans" who mostly never knew how sublime were the champions in their midst. Unlike many celebrities before and since, Russell was an "outspoken" civil rights worker, collecting signatures to end segregation in fair weather and foul. He never faltered in setting an example of principled leadership. Even his European American teammates respected Russ for the integrity and dedication he brought to all his endeavors. Even now his public statements are more thoughtful and comprehensive than other sports figures. Perhaps more than anything, this is a study of character. This helps make it suitable for many courses in US history, race relations, even leadership and teamwork in the corporate world (though the notion of Russ inspiring profit maximization is distasteful). This book has something for almost everyone. Enjoy!